April 22, 2015

Big boost in defense, national security spending in new budget

Brian LilleyRebel Co-Founder
 

Increased spending on defense and national security are big items in the new budget.

I'll walk you through a closer look at the departments and agencies that will see funding increases.

It adds up to billions of dollars over the next decade and beyond.

PS: Here's my earlier report on the overall budget, and how it will impact your family.

Do you think this budget goes far enough in terms of funding national security and the armed forces?

Tell us in the comments!


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Comments
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commented 2015-04-22 20:22:36 -0400
We definitely need to step it up.
commented 2015-04-22 16:45:20 -0400
It is about time we start funding our short changed military again. Canadians have proved time and again that we can defend our nation as well as the allies with honour and military acumen. If the politicians could all stand up for our military men and women and support their needs with proper intelligence, equipment, arms, etc. the common sense Canadians would support them. Canadians are proud of our military, as they should be, but we also need to fund our soldiers properly and I am certainly pleased to see that this government has seen the need to do just that. Look around the world, including our own country, and it doesn’t take long to figure out that Canada has to be involved. And that means funding our military.
Loved George Dyer’s humour!!
commented 2015-04-22 15:51:47 -0400
With the lack of American defence spending and the down sizing of the American armed forces, that leaves Canada and her other allies to pick up the slack. In our case we have to double the size of our armed forces from 67,000 to at least 110,000 In the next 10 years we have to rebuild our navy and ice breaking ships. In the next 10 years the CF-35 come into service we need helicopters In 10 years our 4 subs will have to be replaced and the next generaration should be nuclear so we can defend our north ( if it were up to me I would lease 2 nuclear subs from the U.S.A. we need them to defend the north) In 10 years we have to look at replacing our tanks We have a long way to up grade our defence. For security we should introduce a visa system that would mean we wold know who and why you want to come to Canada and that means from every nation.
commented 2015-04-22 14:26:10 -0400
I like that there is more spent on defense & intelligence.
commented 2015-04-22 14:25:12 -0400
George, I love your humour! The sad part is that I can hear the left whining about those things, though they probably won’t state those reasons you gave with their “outside” voice.
commented 2015-04-22 14:11:12 -0400
Egil. I echo your sentiments. Why did the CPC cut the military budget to begin with? The new funding amounts to less than 1 billion. It’s peanuts. How about a REAL committment to the military. We should be cutting social program spending for the benefit of the military, not the other way around. Otherwise this government is little better than the Liberals that preceeded it. I am also concerned about giving more money and power to CSIS and the RCMP, two organizations that don’t deserve our trust.
commented 2015-04-22 13:45:06 -0400
Love the sarcasm, George Dyer! :)
commented 2015-04-22 13:31:41 -0400
New frigates and ice breakers?
commented 2015-04-22 13:26:25 -0400
Quite possibly the worst budget in our country’s history.

Everyone knows we should short-change our military for risking their lives to save ours. How come Oliver isn’t pumping these extra millions into the CBC instead? What was he thinking?

Why is there no incentive to cut carbon dioxide emissions? Doesn’t he know that the consequence of that inaction is that trees and plant life will flourish and overdose us with oxygen? Just what kind of a planet does he want our children and grandchildren to inherit?

What’s all this about giving seniors a helping hand? It’s common knowledge that the very last thing that seniors’ want is a helping hand; they’re too proud, and they would be the first to tell you that while they’re whacking you with their old worn out walking sticks.

Balancing the budget by raiding the contingency fund to help cover the cost of a contingency! Has the man lost leave of his senses? It’s a standard accounting practice to steal E.I. and pension fund money to achieve that.

Tax breaks for hard working middle class families – utter nonsense, and don’t even get me started on the child tax benefit. Who will feed our global warming eco-activist whackos when the money that is rightfully theirs is being squandered on our children?

Time for change.
commented 2015-04-22 13:11:35 -0400
William Maciura, I agree. But you won’t see that sort of promise made on any campaign trail.

As to Brian’s question, does the budget go far enough to fund the armed forces and national security, it is hard to tell without knowing specifically what the increased funds will be spent on. I get it that ISIS and domestic jihad were mentioned but I’d like to know specifically what strategy is planned.

The armed forces need not only new equipment but also better leadership. Being always directed to stand down and appease our enemies is destructive to morale and to the war effort. I’d like to see the money spent on getting the job done, not on politically correct efforts to avoid a fight.

As to national security and the domestic threat, again we need better leadership. I hope the power Bill C-51 gives to CSIS will be directed by a vision that sets out very clear standards and values for all Canadians instead of pandering to every interest to gain political favour. I like that CSIS will share information with other security agencies but only if they take a leadership role in setting the agenda.

As to how to reach out to at-risk youth, I hope they don’t make the same mistakes RCMP did by partnering with extremist jihadi Canadian interests. They must be clear about our values and make it clear that those values, and more importantly, our Constitution, will not be compromised.

Tall order, I know, but you asked.
commented 2015-04-22 12:54:27 -0400
This is kind of interesting, from the same link.
"The military generally increased in the late 1980s, reaching its highest numbers in 1991 with more than 120,000 people (Chart A). The subsequent decline continued until 2001 when personnel numbered 81,600, about a 33% decrease. Since then, the forces have grown steadily, reaching 87,700 in 2006. These changes are related to the international political climate—the rapid decline occurring after the end of the Cold War and the recent increase coinciding with the war on terror since 9/11.1 "

Looks like we could get away with some expansion all right. Could have done it sooner in my opinion.
commented 2015-04-22 12:51:51 -0400
William M, where do you get that, this is a number from 2006, from an archived doc, but it looks like there is quite a gap between civilian and military in the DND.
“The forces also contribute significantly to the economy. With more than 111,000 people on the payroll (including about 24,000 civilian workers)
“”http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2008107/article/10657-eng.htm">http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2008107/article/10657-eng.htm
commented 2015-04-22 12:11:09 -0400
The Defense budget will not be solved until the civilian bureaucrats are cut back in DND. Right now the civilians out number CF members and that is not right.
commented 2015-04-22 11:44:25 -0400
This is a welcome change, its a first important step towards revitalizing our Armed Forces. We need a lot of new equipment!
commented 2015-04-22 11:39:40 -0400
Considering the conservatives have slashed spending on the military as a percentage of GDP I do not trust them to follow through. For example; where are the promised helicopters? The warships degraded into a make work project for Atlantic Canada and the new fighter jet is still ‘up in the air’.