May 01, 2015

Debate: Is the Conservative budget really "conservative"?

Marissa SemkiwRebel Commentator
 

With budget season behind us, Anthony Furey takes a look at the federal budget (and several provincial budgets) and concludes: "The country is not as fiscally right as you might think."

Even though the federal Conservatives introduced a balanced budget for the first time in seven years, and projected a $1.4 billion surplus, Furey remains pessimistic:

"This budget is probably the most conservative budget we'll see in a fifteen year period-- and it isn't particularly fiscally conservative. That's why I'm worried."

It's a sad state of affairs, he adds, when Quebec is the only province making headlines for true fiscally conservative moves.


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commented 2015-05-06 10:15:24 -0400
If you think that Quebec as the more conservative budget in all of Canada, it will only show that you are gullible and have been fooled by the “magic” tricks of accounting.

The PLQ, in December of 2014, hike taxes and all on average of 1400$ per family… just a couple of months before their budget. So their budget looks good because they did the lazy thing behind closed doors.

So if for you a conservative budget includes raising taxes and all by an average of 1400$ per family is conservative, Then, I’m might not be conservative after all!
commented 2015-05-02 17:22:31 -0400
BECAUSE IT’S THE WEEKEND I NOTICED IT’S SLOW FOR NEWS ON THE REBEL.MEDIA THEY HAVE TO HAVE A DAY OR TWO OFF JUST LIKE YOU & ME HERE’S WHAT HAPPENED TODAY IN HISTORY I HOPE YOU ENJOY.

1933 LEAD STORY
Loch Ness Monster sighted

Although accounts of an aquatic beast living in Scotland’s Loch Ness date back 1,500 years, the modern legend of the Loch Ness Monster is born when a sighting makes local news on May 2, 1933. The newspaper Inverness Courier related an account of a local couple who claimed to have seen “an enormous animal rolling and plunging on the surface.” The story of the “monster” (a moniker chosen by the Courier editor) became a media phenomenon, with London newspapers sending correspondents to Scotland and a circus offering a 20,000 pound sterling reward for capture of the beast.
Loch Ness, located in the Scottish Highlands, has the largest volume of fresh water in Great Britain; the body of water reaches a depth of nearly 800 feet and a length of about 23 miles. Scholars of the Loch Ness Monster find a dozen references to “Nessie” in Scottish history, dating back to around A.D. 500, when local Picts carved a strange aquatic creature into standing stones near Loch Ness. The earliest written reference to a monster in Loch Ness is a 7th-century biography of Saint Columba, the Irish missionary who introduced Christianity to Scotland. In 565, according to the biographer, Columba was on his way to visit the king of the northern Picts near Inverness when he stopped at Loch Ness to confront a beast that had been killing people in the lake. Seeing a large beast about to attack another man, Columba intervened, invoking the name of God and commanding the creature to “go back with all speed.” The monster retreated and never killed another man.
In 1933, a new road was completed along Loch Ness’ shore, affording drivers a clear view of the loch. After an April 1933 sighting was reported in the local paper on May 2, interest steadily grew, especially after another couple claimed to have seen the beast on land, crossing the shore road. Several British newspapers sent reporters to Scotland, including London’s Daily Mail, which hired big-game hunter Marmaduke Wetherell to capture the beast. After a few days searching the loch, Wetherell reported finding footprints of a large four-legged animal. In response, the Daily Mail carried the dramatic headline: “MONSTER OF LOCH NESS IS NOT LEGEND BUT A FACT.” Scores of tourists descended on Loch Ness and sat in boats or decks chairs waiting for an appearance by the beast. Plaster casts of the footprints were sent to the British Natural History Museum, which reported that the tracks were that of a hippopotamus, specifically one hippopotamus foot, probably stuffed. The hoax temporarily deflated Loch Ness Monster mania, but stories of sightings continued.
A famous 1934 photograph seemed to show a dinosaur-like creature with a long neck emerging out of the murky waters, leading some to speculate that “Nessie” was a solitary survivor of the long-extinct plesiosaurs. The aquatic plesiosaurs were thought to have died off with the rest of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Loch Ness was frozen solid during the recent ice ages, however, so this creature would have had to have made its way up the River Ness from the sea in the past 10,000 years. And the plesiosaurs, believed to be cold-blooded, would not long survive in the frigid waters of Loch Ness. More likely, others suggested, it was an archeocyte, a primitive whale with a serpentine neck that is thought to have been extinct for 18 million years. Skeptics argued that what people were seeing in Loch Ness were “seiches”–oscillations in the water surface caused by the inflow of cold river water into the slightly warmer loch.
Amateur investigators kept an almost constant vigil, and in the 1960s several British universities launched expeditions to Loch Ness, using sonar to search the deep. Nothing conclusive was found, but in each expedition the sonar operators detected large, moving underwater objects they could not explain. In 1975, Boston’s Academy of Applied Science combined sonar and underwater photography in an expedition to Loch Ness. A photo resulted that, after enhancement, appeared to show the giant flipper of a plesiosaur-like creature. Further sonar expeditions in the 1980s and 1990s resulted in more tantalizing, if inconclusive, readings. Revelations in 1994 that the famous 1934 photo was a hoax hardly dampened the enthusiasm of tourists and professional and amateur investigators to the legend of the Loch Ness Monster.
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commented 2015-05-02 16:27:00 -0400
No as good as last week but quite charming when you turned it on, Anthony. You could call the Friday piece The Anthony Whisperer or The Sound and The Furey, or Beauty and the Beast.
commented 2015-05-02 15:34:35 -0400
SORRY, ANTHONY – I’M ON MARISSA’S SIDE – GO MARISSA GO!!!!!!! WOOO HOOOO!!!!!!!
commented 2015-05-02 15:32:29 -0400
“Chretien and Martin balanced budgets by taking from provinces.” And from the EI fund, and Pension Funds, and anywhere else they could steal money from. I recall the Chretien/Martin Liberals introducing budgets with say, an 11 percent tax hike in some form, then dropping it back, claiming they were giving Taxpayers a “tax cut”. Despicable. I agree with the prevailing sentiment the current Fed Budget is meant to appeal to as many people as possible prior to an election. Who dosen’t like keeping more of their hard earned money? Socialists maybe, but they really excel in spending other people’s money until it runs out, and they then declare the “rich” must pay. By definition, the “rich” in this country is really the middle class as that is where collectively the majority of assets are held, real estate, etc. etc. Trudope, saying he wants to “help” the middle class gives me the chills. I think he and the Liberals really just want to help themselves as they did in Adscam. Realistically, all we have heard from the current opposition parties so far, is they will legalize marijuana (yeah, let’s keep the voter stoned, so they don’t notice) and we will raise your taxes to spend on our priorities.
commented 2015-05-02 12:53:25 -0400
Chretien and Martin balanced budgets by taking from provinces.

Harper started out on unsure footing. He had to make budgets that kept him in power. We don’t need disgruntled Libertarians bringing down the Conservative Party with frivolous criticisms.

No offence, Furious Furey’s boy Friday … :-)

Having said that, I too want smaller government. Stating with firing all the sleepers.
commented 2015-05-02 11:44:47 -0400
quebec oh come on anthony they have national day care the are spending money in trying to put gun registration in Quebec they want to give alot of money out for enviromental hoaxes and all the government money they spend on unions.
commented 2015-05-02 06:04:10 -0400
Oh, and I agree with James Small. Marissa, what is it with this time limit thing? Take all the time you need. And Anthony, thanks for letting Marissa talk on occasion. :)
commented 2015-05-02 05:59:34 -0400
Could Joe Oliver have cut further? For sure.
Could this budget have been closer to a true fiscal conservative budget? Yes, of course.
Are these federal Conservatives as conservative as many conservatives would like to see? Undoubtedly not.
Is this budget the best budget that they cold have come out with considering all factors? Probably not.

However, considering this is an election year this budget has to please any many people as possible and annoy as few as possible. Have they achieved this goal? Probably about as good as they could have.

I like the taxable income reduction offers, such as the increase to tax free savings limit. That’s about all that affects me, so according to Justie and Tommie, I am one of the rich. Woo Hoo! Oh, wait, I still have very little to spend.

Even if this budget does not affect me personally very much, I’ll be plenty happy if it gets Harper back in that PM chair.

Some have mentioned that Harper is not fiscally and/or socially a conservative enough. Well, much of that is subjective to each person doing the evaluating as there is not absolute line that defines conservative from not. And as a result, Harper will always be criticized for being too conservative while at the same time being criticized for not being enough conservative.

Harper is, however, far better at leading this country than the leader of any of the other parties. None of them are even in the same league.
commented 2015-05-02 02:40:31 -0400
Fiscally and socially, I don’t see Stephen Harper as a conservative, just as a Jean Chretien or Paul Martin liberal. This is what passes for conservative in Canada now. But it’s still better than either a JT or NDP socialist regime.
commented 2015-05-02 00:55:39 -0400
I just hope we can have a majority Conservative government for at least 5 more years or until there is a reasonable opponent, that wont cripple our economy and country. The left wing parties can make massive cuts a lot easier than the right wing parties. That is just a fact. They just don’t face the same type of political pressures when they themselves make the cuts, and that is the reason.
commented 2015-05-02 00:51:40 -0400
Was gonna post a salient comment here but I see the three previous comments stole my thunder, and I’m so glad they did. The only complaint I have on this video is Marissa’s last comment of “That’s all the time we have”. Hunh? This is a webcast! Take all the time you want!!! Love ya Marissa!
commented 2015-05-01 22:28:16 -0400
Government can always be smaller in my opinion. This may be the first budget actually balanced by the Conservatives, but Flaherty did a damn fine job in past years. He was very cognisant of the big picture, and we have a lot to thank him for, for helping Canada get through that recession. Oliver has passed his first budget for us, and I would say he gets an A. All of what they have done this year, makes sense. I’d really like to see the bureaucracy trimmed. We could do a heck of a lot more if we didn’t have to pay out so many pensions. Harper knows the economy, and gets good men to help him.
commented 2015-05-01 20:28:54 -0400
The problem with Canada is there are three levels of government all wanting to grab money from the electorate. The right direction is to eliminate government and the legalized theft known as taxes. Thanks for the Rebel letting us know from Mr. Furey that the Conservatives are doing little to make things right. Marissa Semkiw seemed to get it. Her reports are usually the most thought provoking.
commented 2015-05-01 20:07:03 -0400
I agree with Anthony that the Federal Government could do more to reduce the size of the government, but I also believe that this is an election friendly budget, a little bit for everyone and that is important because if the other parties should gain control we know what the outcome will be. Trudeau is not Jean Chrétien or John Turner when it comes to fiscal responsibility and Tom Mulcair will strangle the economy like Greg Selinger is in Manitoba.