May 02, 2016

New Turkish film “Mustang” a poignant movie every so-called feminist should see

Justin TobinRebel Blogger

The warm-hearted, beautifully shot film "Mustang" (2015) was nominated for best foreign language film at both the 2016 Golden Globes and the 2016 Academy Awards. 

The warm-hearted, beautifully shot film "Mustang" (2015) was nominated for best foreign language film at both the 2016 Golden Globes and the 2016 Academy Awards.

"Mustang" is a coming-of-age tale about five Turkish schoolgirls, all sisters. It begins with them laughing with boys at a beach, sitting atop boys’ shoulders while playfully splashing about, and other innocent, youthful behavior.

When their uncle and grandmother get word of their perceived sexual immorality, the girls are taken out of school and confined to their house, a compound with barred windows in a remote Turkish village.

The girls' cell phones and computers are taken away. While kept under lock and key, they are taught how to cook, dress, and perform other womanly duties. They are to be kept like this until, one by one, they are married off in arranged marriages to young men they barely know, as is customary in the area. Much of the plot involves the girls planning their escape to Istanbul.

"Mustang" never explicitly references Islam or Turkey’s moderate Muslim culture, but it is on full display for the viewer.

Some of the comedy: When the girls arrive home from the beach, their grandmother scolds them for rubbing themselves against boys’ necks. They explain they were simply sitting on the boys’ shoulders, playing a game. To show how ridiculous the grandmother’s accusation is, one girl begins destroying chairs. When the grandmother asks what she’s doing, the young girl says, “These chairs touched our a***holes! That’s disgusting.”

The grandmother is mainly outraged because she is afraid of what her son – Uncle Erol – will do about the girls’ "obscene behavior," and worried that their delinquency reflects badly on her. As a hijab-wearing woman tells her, “It’s come to this because you didn’t do your job right.”

Sure enough, Uncle Erol drives the girls to a clinic to have the doctor make sure their hymens are still intact.

We see one of the girls on the wedding day of her arranged marriage. Music, gun play and alcohol consumption are all part of the wedding reception in moderate Muslim Turkey. The new bride is shown downing as much liquor as she can get her hands on, presumably to drown out her sorrows.

After sex with her new husband, the new bride is confused – as is the groom – that there is no blood on the sheets. In a suspenseful scene, the groom’s parents knock on the bedroom door, demanding to see the sheets as proof of the new bride’s purity.

After swearing that she was a virgin, the girl is rushed to a hospital to find out what is “wrong” with her. A doctor examines the new bride, and explains that her hymen -- which doesn’t always break after a single act of sexual intercourse -- is still intact. Here’s some more comedic dialogue: The doctor says, “Your husband doesn’t seem very romantic,” to which the girl replies, “I don’t know him very well.”

It is argued that "Mustang" (2015) serves as a sort of cinematic plea for women’s rights. While I agree, I have yet to hear feminists criticizing moderate Muslim countries, let alone places like Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan, where women are prohibited from driving, where honour killings are a frequent occurrence, and where women are unable to go anywhere unless accompanied by a man.

Either I’m going deaf, or modern feminists are too busy whining for the government to pay for third trimester abortions and making the nonsensical claim that there is a "rape culture" in the west.

Seriously, feminists, your cherry picking of non-problems is not only trivializing atrocities committed abroad, it is downright evil.

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commented 2016-05-03 20:29:48 -0400
“your cherry picking of non-problems "

Apropos turn of phase there
commented 2016-05-02 23:50:52 -0400
Maybe she rode a horse. .,