May 06, 2015

Ten interesting things about the NDP win in Alberta

Rebel Staff
 

The NDP win in Alberta is unprecedented — the party has never been more than a fringe. But what does it mean?

Ezra has ten thoughts on the night’s earthquake. 

How will the new Premier, Rachel Notley, manage a caucus of accidental MLAs — including candidates so young, many are still in school?

Will Notley still oppose fracking, pipelines and oilsands expansion — or will she put jobs and economic growth first?

Notley’s husband, Lou Arab, is a senior union boss with CUPE. Will the unions gorge themselves on Canada’s most industrious province?

For Ezra’s answers to these and other perplexing questions, you won’t want to miss his sizzling hot take on the news. It’s a point of view you won’t find anywhere else!

Comments
You must be logged in to comment. Click here to log in.
commented 2015-05-07 06:48:09 -0400
I’m not sure that the sky has fallen, although it does feel like hell just froze over. Who would have thought Albertans would ever vote in an NDP government? That said, it’s clear to me that this was a protest vote. The PCs ran themselves out of town. Wildrose seems to need some time to regroup and grow their support and it’s image had been damaged by Smith and cronies’ mass defection. I’m not sure that many of the voters who voted NDP actually favour a died in the wool socialist regime. An interesting thing about the Alberta NDP is that while it contains a mixed bag of the usual left and fringe characters, it is dominated by entirely by unions and for the most part the unions support oil sands development because of the jobs it creates and dues revenue it brings in. Where your economy is so dependent on one resource, you tend to not want it shut down. It will be interesting to watch how Notley handles the split between the fringers and the business unionists.

I think Albertans are in for 4 years that will in some ways resemble the Bob Rae era in Ontario – Notely will expand the bureaucracy, new laws will be passed giving unions more power, and there will be some entertaining pronouncements from the fringers. But I doubt they will last more than one term. The next government will repeal, as happened in Ontario, any really disagreeable legislation from the Notley era and life will go on. I can see Wildrose being successful next time around. The PCs will be in the wilderness for the foreseeable future.
commented 2015-05-07 06:34:23 -0400
What was the meaning of all those purple ties and dresses on the CBC last night Ezra?
commented 2015-05-07 00:57:15 -0400
I live in Manitoba & the NDP have been governing here forever it seems, but will boot them out in the next election. No one benefits under them because their motto is “tax & tax more”. If Albertans did not trust the PC then why not vote for Wildrose? I heard one voter say that she wanted change, but be careful what you wish for. Isn’t that what Obama was promising in his campaign & we all know how that turned out. People who make that comment are usually clueless & just follow the crowd. Time will tell but I am not holding my breath that the “change” will be for the better. As someone else pointed out…..those in the have not provinces who are now rejoicing, hold on to your wallet because you won’t be rejoicing for long if Alberta’s economy tanks.
commented 2015-05-07 00:23:59 -0400
It really is hard to believe that Albertans would totally screw themselves over to chase out the Redford, Prentice, trough feeders by voting NDP. I woke up this morning and I thought it was a bad dream. Is the infiltration from other provinces a bigger factor than anticipated, and why on earth do people move to Alberta to change it. We are(were) proud of the Alberta advantage. The whole country will pay a cost for this mistake. It will be a lesson to all of us. I will make my children take note of every slide, every downgrade, every back step Alberta takes into the black hole of socialism, so that they don’t forget, and will make sure it never happens again.

And Smith and Prentice better get out of Dodge, I never want to see either of them again.
commented 2015-05-06 22:41:04 -0400
Socialists/ Communists/Nazis (all kind of left viruses) always came in time of weakness they successfully exploit. The West as civilization is sick from left oriented populists starting from Europe, Obama, some Canadian provinces and now Alberta.
What we have in Alberta now (NDP) is logical result or punishment we failed to prevent doing right thing to vote out PC a lot of time ago. Rural Alberta is only hope left as Calgary and Edmonton are clearly under influence of left minded destroyers.
Wildrose must find the way to organize true conservatives to win next time.
PC is dead for good. And this, my friends, is only good news we have for now.
commented 2015-05-06 22:16:47 -0400
I understand that many people actually believe in socialism as a sustainable form of government, but what I don’t get is how people, seemingly in their right mind, vote on mass for college students (at least four), one only 20 years old, some reported to have never had a job . . . to be their MLA? I also don’t get how nearly half of Albertans did not even bother to vote! They saw the polls. Make no mistake, we will get what we deserve and other provinces that currently rake in billions in transfer payments from Alberta will also get what they deserve.
commented 2015-05-06 20:04:15 -0400
Hiro, you are exactly correct. Please folks, don’t despair. Stay and fight. We have a chance of salvaging prosperity. We can’t allow “we the people” to become “screw the people”
commented 2015-05-06 19:33:48 -0400
HIRO SIMEZ thanks for bringing up an interesting contributing factor.
commented 2015-05-06 19:25:18 -0400
Well they have won by a significant majority.Now all you can do is hold their feet to the fire if they mess up.Scary thought if they do a good job will other provinces and the feds follow the course? All we can do is wait and see
commented 2015-05-06 17:55:43 -0400
I don’t know if I agree Ezra. Would conservative Albertans really vote NDP out of protest? They got to know the damage the NDP has done in other provinces? Do they know what they did?
commented 2015-05-06 17:35:28 -0400
I see a few striking similarities between what happened in this election and the NDP sweep in Quebec in the last federal election. As the press and the polls started to show the NDP gaining ground, it looked like a massive switching of alliances suddenly took place – almost as if people wanted to be seen as having cheered for a winning team. The other thing that supports the notion that this was to a great extent a purely emotional vote, is the utter inexperience and thin resumes of many of the candidates.
commented 2015-05-06 16:43:10 -0400
Celebrating in Calgary, and celebrations in Riyadh as well, I imagine. We must remember that much of this mess was brought about by oil price manipulation by OPEC. They are hoping to kill the North American goose that lays the Golden Egg. Not at all successful, so far…. but Alberta just bought an axe!
commented 2015-05-06 16:33:18 -0400
“Signals from an NDP government that when the time is right they will be tempted to raise royalty rates and increase corporate tax rates — these are negative signals for investor confidence. This is a very narrow margin industry and it doesn’t take much for investment decisions to turn into red ink.” That is the reality of it. Higher taxes and higher royalty rates are on the table. This will stifle investment for years to come.
commented 2015-05-06 16:33:17 -0400
“Signals from an NDP government that when the time is right they will be tempted to raise royalty rates and increase corporate tax rates — these are negative signals for investor confidence. This is a very narrow margin industry and it doesn’t take much for investment decisions to turn into red ink.” That is the reality of it. Higher taxes and higher royalty rates are on the table. This will stifle investment for years to come.
commented 2015-05-06 16:33:16 -0400
“Signals from an NDP government that when the time is right they will be tempted to raise royalty rates and increase corporate tax rates — these are negative signals for investor confidence. This is a very narrow margin industry and it doesn’t take much for investment decisions to turn into red ink.” That is the reality of it. Higher taxes and higher royalty rates are on the table. This will stifle investment for years to come.
commented 2015-05-06 16:33:15 -0400
“Signals from an NDP government that when the time is right they will be tempted to raise royalty rates and increase corporate tax rates — these are negative signals for investor confidence. This is a very narrow margin industry and it doesn’t take much for investment decisions to turn into red ink.” That is the reality of it. Higher taxes and higher royalty rates are on the table. This will stifle investment for years to come.
commented 2015-05-06 16:33:15 -0400
“Signals from an NDP government that when the time is right they will be tempted to raise royalty rates and increase corporate tax rates — these are negative signals for investor confidence. This is a very narrow margin industry and it doesn’t take much for investment decisions to turn into red ink.” That is the reality of it. Higher taxes and higher royalty rates are on the table. This will stifle investment for years to come.
commented 2015-05-06 14:51:33 -0400
I havn’t heard this rumour yet so might as well start it now… It’s rumoured that Danielle Smith is trying to negotiate a deal with the NDP to secretly join them and work as a back room consultant.
commented 2015-05-06 14:27:47 -0400
Not a good analysis since we have to wait and see what they can do. All of his points could have been made of the Wildrose party as well since they don’t have any experience either.
commented 2015-05-06 13:25:54 -0400
Good analysis, but what just about everyone seems to overlook is that the population of the province increased dramatically over the past few years. To the local 3 million folks another million was added. And watching the election map, it was no surprise that NDP made great strides where the newcomers (ON, QC, BC and Maritimes, all traditionally leftist provinces) were most present. These transplants, I believe, brought with them quite a bit of “Californian disease”. By that I mean that these people traditionally continued voting for what they knew and pretty much helping to elect the type of people that destroyed their home economies (as it was demonstrated in CO and TX, for example, that saw a huge inflow of ex-Californians and that affected/damaged the local politics).
Also, by talking about systematic changes (corp taxes, royalties et al) everyone forgets about small but meaningful stuff. Like automatic speed traps, carbon tax on fuel, emissions testing for motorists, promoted or forced unionization, etc.. NDP may lose the next elections if they are too reckless to heat the pond for frogs to notice. But how can anyone think that the next governing party, whoever it may be, will not capitalize and continue using these “advancements”?
And finally, everyone being polite and chooses to avoid pointing out that the so called “protest voting” for anybody but XXXX, and ending with a much worse outcome, is utterly infantile (“I’ll eat snow and catch cold just to piss off mom”) and stupid. And this is what too many voters readily demonstrated.
So overall, I am very pessimistic about the future of my home province.
commented 2015-05-06 13:10:47 -0400
This probably solidifies Alberta for Harper if he plays his cards right. All it will take is a couple of hefty layoffs this summer from companies in the oil industry blaming government planned strategies or just plain not trusting the new government and people will be scared S-less and take it out on the federal NDP in fall.
commented 2015-05-06 12:02:14 -0400
The NDP in Alberta ran on a platform of increasing corporate taxes and increasing royalty rates on oil producers to balance the budget. How can this end well for Alberta’s business and oil industry? There is not other way they can get this money. I for one think the big winner in this election is Saskatchewan. Lower tax environment and more attractive royalty scheme, you just watch how capital flows east out of Alberta and into Saskatchewan.
commented 2015-05-06 11:14:33 -0400
Mark I agree, its like cutting off your nose to spite your face . Alberta has just torn its house down to chase out the rat. It doesn’t seem real smart, and I am ticked off as well.
commented 2015-05-06 10:48:00 -0400
Wildrose has 4 years to rebuild true conservative movement to get Alberta back from hands of communists. Damage politically, economically and morally is done by pseudo conservative (not existing already PC) and we will pay the price. And it will be long, long painful journey back home.
commented 2015-05-06 10:35:03 -0400
Fascinating result in Alberta. Ezra, I believe you are right, the Alberta voters are not interested in a hard-left turn and will most likely return just as strong, if not stronger, to Harper’s party this fall. Last night was a bad, bad night for Justin Trudeau in that case, whose best hope was probably the continued misrule of Alberta by Prentice’s gang.
commented 2015-05-06 10:04:38 -0400
Ontario once elected an NDP government. Like Alberta it was largely a vote against the other parties. Like Ontario who watched the NDP flush the economy down the drain, while allowing BIG union to run the province, so too will Alberta learn the lesson that Ontario learned;
NDP radicals are not fit to govern.’
Alberta will pay the price as Ontario did. (of course now Ontario is saddled with the Liberals who, as it turns out, are far worse than their NDP fellow travellers)
commented 2015-05-06 09:54:25 -0400
I fear the unions, aided by Notley, will run amok of things. Back in the day, Unions in Canada fought for everyone to have free health care, and people supported them. While at the same time American unions fought for the corporations to pay for THEIR health care. Now it seems the roles have reversed. Alberta Unions are only focused on there own paychecks, under the guise of doing it for the benefit of everyone. This will be an interesting time for the unions in Alberta. It will be up to them show the people of Alberta that this isn’t only about padding their bank accounts.

The proof will be in the pudding.
commented 2015-05-06 09:45:30 -0400
While I understand the mass protest vote against the provincial Conservatives, I’m angry as hell at my fellow Albertans who actually voted in a spendthrift government. (That the mainstream media was complicit in this election is beyond question, just not provable in a court of law… otherwise there might be lawsuits. Too bad.) Well, it’s a done deal, and now we’ll have to suffer through the next four years. Maybe, as some claim, this NDP government will be different from all the rest (as I try my hardest not to laugh derisively at that statement) — but I’m not hopeful. Albertans can expect an increase in “environmental protection” [job-killing anti-oil policies and increase in carbon taxes and the like — watch your gasoline prices take a huge jump to “come into line” with other provinces!], “social caring” [Welfare will be easier to get than ever, rates will increase, special interest will be going to “non-traditional” sexes and drug addicts and the like], and to pay for it taxes will be increased across the board. Will the large corporations cough up? Only on paper. They’ll raise their rates and pass on the “tax increase” to us, even as we’re told we can expect a tax decrease [like that has EVER happened in an NDP government]. Will the NDP pay attention to the law on the books that a sitting government MUST live within its budget, and NOT draw a deficit? (This was enacted in the Klein years, and has not been repealed.) I’m not holding my breath.

There will be another backlash — this new government will last only 1, repeat, ONE term. But who will replace them in four years? “The devil we know” as the Conservatives? God knows they needed a shakeup, and they’ve got it. They need a new leader, and a refocusing of direction. Maybe they could turn things around then… but I wonder. Will the Wildrose replace the NDP in four years? Not if the media has its (s)way. But in four years there will be a public clamoring to get the ballooning debt under control and to lower taxes. Who will Albertans vote for then? Guaranteed, it won’t be the NDP!