August 23, 2016

Rio Olympics: The political lows and athletic highs, with GUESTS Nonie Darwish, Michael Taube

Tiffany GabbayRebel Host
 

Tonight we'll depart from the typical news cycle to take a look at the 2016 Rio Olympics, and how the games really provide insight into our current culture wars: From the poor treatment of Israeli athletes by the delegations of various Muslim countries, to athletes using their high profile to talk politics (even though all of this supposedly goes against the International Olympic Committee's Charter.)

Why, during the one occasion where politics could have and should have been put aside, are some athletes simply unwilling to do so? Joining us to discuss is person who I think has a clear answer: Nonie Darwish, author of the books "The Devil We Don't Know" and "Now They Call Me Infidel."

But while there were certainly some disheartening moments during the Rio games, there were also those that contributed to our shared humanity and did their countries proud. They deserve a spotlight.

Michael Taube, Troy Media syndicated columnist and speechwriter for former Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, followed the games and weighs in tonight.

Comments
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commented 2016-09-03 18:34:18 -0400
As far as the olympics go… who gives a damn. They are just games.
commented 2016-09-03 18:32:19 -0400
Argh. Your sound engineer isn’t doing her job.
commented 2016-08-26 21:47:19 -0400
OMG.. You guys don’t like a LADY.
commented 2016-08-24 12:45:01 -0400
The Olympic code of ethics is largely meaningless. For it to meet this code they’d have to exclude a lot of the world. It’s become a showcase for tyrants & a platform for Israel (Jew) bashing.
commented 2016-08-24 01:44:15 -0400
Tiffany Gabbay titles her posts “Culture Wars”. Probably not a good start to a comment on the Olympics. The modern games were intended from the beginning to bring together all nations in a spirit of co-operation and sportsmanship.

After having watched the young men and women running, swimming, and jumping with others from over two-hundred countries, it sounds like sour-soup to try to identify biases between religions and nations. Israel is a small country, their two medals did them proud.

Canada is a medium country and our tenth-place standing in the medal count did us proud. Many people imitated the grin of Andre de Grasse, as they should.

Is this really something to put under the title “culture wars”? Wouldn’t it be better called “culture peace”?
commented 2016-08-24 01:44:09 -0400
Tiffany Gabbay titles her posts “Culture Wars”. Probably not a good start to a comment on the Olympics. The modern games were intended from the beginning to bring together all nations in a spirit of co-operation and sportsmanship.

After having watched the young men and women running, swimming, and jumping with others from over two-hundred countries, it sounds like sour-soup to try to identify biases between religions and nations. Israel is a small country, their two medals did them proud.

Canada is a medium country and our tenth-place standing in the medal count did us proud. Many people imitated the grin of Andre de Grasse, as they should.

Is this really something to put under the title “culture wars”? Wouldn’t it be better called “culture peace”?
commented 2016-08-23 23:29:02 -0400
I have been fascinated by the Olympics since I was a child in the ‘60s. I lived through most of the 50 year gold medal drought where third rate Canadian hockey teams regularly got their arses kicked by the Central Red Army “amateur” team, until we got to Salt Lake City. Watched it live on TV in Mexico City when the American sprinters fouled the 200 m. medal ceremony with political BS. Mention Munich ’72 and the first thing most people remember is not the games, but the terrorist attack.
Yet we still see the European stuffed shirts stand at the podium during the opening/closing ceremonies, reciting the tired old carved in stone references to “the young people of the world” and “the glory of sport,” as if nothing has changed since the 19th century.
Yes, there was plenty of bad behavior in Rio, but as three of us pointed out in our letters published in today’s Calgary Sun, we in Canada have better things to remember about these Olympics.

http://www.calgarysun.com/2016/08/22/letters-to-the

Congratulations to all the Canadians who competed at Rio de Janiero. Whether they finished first or last, they’re are all winners.
commented 2016-08-23 22:02:18 -0400
what we all saw was respect for other athletes . something that is missing all over the world today.