July 25, 2017

Green subsidies keep flowing: Feds to spend $8M to spur electric car sales

Brian LilleyArchive

The public ain't buying them but progressives really are selling them. 

It seems like every week there is a new subsidy or outpouring of public money for some kind of green venture, including electric cars.

Watch as I explain how the latest boondoggle is an attempt to make it easier for people with electric cars to go on long trips - using your money.

How many electric cars are there? How does that compare to other car sales?

I break down the numbers and it might be enough to make you cry.

Comments
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commented 2017-07-27 02:01:11 -0400
Andrew Stephenson i bet i am greener than you in my lifestyle.
commented 2017-07-27 02:00:44 -0400
Andrew the difference is that gas powered cars work , so people will need gas later.
commented 2017-07-26 13:11:28 -0400
Peter Netterville said in part, “Andrew is really hot for the green energy tech but it appears she does not live the green life style she pushes on all of us. Makes me wonder why.”

Peter, my guess is she is an eco-fascist.
commented 2017-07-26 13:06:55 -0400
“Tammie Putinski-Zandbelt commented 14 hours ago
Peter Netterville said in part, “Andrew, do you own and use an all electric car?”
Peter, she won’t answer, I have asked this of her a couple of times, with other questions about her EV’

I own a conventional car, but it only sees maybe 2000km a year on errands. I commute by bike or bus since it’s cheaper than parking. I probably wouldn’t have bought it knowing how things turned out, but it’s paid for so whatever. My next car, if I buy one, will be electric since the range constraints are meaningless when you live in a city that’s15km end to end, and even with our relatively high coal fraction, it’s still a net gain environmentally.

|When the Hong Kong prefecture eliminated the tax rebate of nearly 50% of the price of an EV, which only benefited those already rich enough to afford one, their sales in the following month dropped 100%. That’s right – 100% – as in, dropped all the way to zero sales the following month."

Kind of like the rush at gas stations when people hear prices are going up, eh? Demand falls off dramatically the next day … but returns sometime after. Same phenomenon…. prospectives all rushed to buy, the market doesn’t go away it’s just rearranged.

“Electric cars with their toxic batteries that last at best 7 years is just another problem: who is going to recycle or remove the toxic heavy metals from depleted batteries? "

Lithium is a light metal, in fact THE lightest metal, and not particularly toxic just challenging to handle. It’s worth a couple dollars a pound, so is worth recovering once enough EVs are on the road to make a supply chain viable. They’ve far outlasted expectations. There are 15+ year old Prius out there on their original batteries. By the way, most electrical generation in canada is low-emission and demand drops at night. Give Ontario something to do with its nighttime glut.

Blackouts are great for EVs, since you can actually run the house off the car battery.
commented 2017-07-26 11:37:34 -0400
Now that I am aging to rapidly, and because Notley and the communists saw fit to make sure my job disappeared, when I am low on energy (money), where is my recharging station? Where is my subsidy? Should be able to roll up to a window and grab a few hundred$ when the tank is low.

Maybe Andrew or some other green freak can explain to me how FREE charging stations can pop up all over the place to save the day. FREE, are you kidding me? The poor fucks who are struggling to keep their families together and put food on the table will be expected to foot the bill AGAIN. The beleaguered tax payer.

I guess if you are rich enough you might not care if your trip from Toronto to Montreal takes a friggin week with recharges along the way. I can’t believe there has not been an outright revolt in Ontario. The skeleton is doing a fine job there. She shows far more concern for cucumbers as opposed to the citizens of your province. Those wind turbines are sure doing the trick.

Many great posts showing the stupidity and hypocrisy of the subsidy bullshit. STEPHEN E….excellent, as are many other comments.
commented 2017-07-26 08:57:12 -0400
It’s coming …

50% cost recovery on EVs.

Free charging.

Zero sales tax on EV purchases.

Zero charges for parking, tolls, and insurance.

Subsidized loans for purchases.

Free registrations.

Substantial discounts (40%) on home electric bills.

All of this will be paid for with carbon and other taxes. This is will be the largest transfer of wealth ever seen. But it will be transferred to the wealthiest Canadians.

Civil war is coming – be ready.
commented 2017-07-26 08:38:39 -0400
Want proof that EV manufacturers are not yet prepared to step into an economy where their product is not heavily subsidized by government?

http://www.businessinsider.com/tesla-sales-stopped-in-hong-kong-tax-break-for-electric-cars-scrapped-2017-7

When the Hong Kong prefecture eliminated the tax rebate of nearly 50% of the price of an EV, which only benefited those already rich enough to afford one, their sales in the following month dropped 100%. That’s right – 100% – as in, dropped all the way to zero sales the following month. They dramatically increased their sales the following month – with a total of five electric vehicles being sold.

Of course, the Tesla rep quoted in the above story tries to apply spin doctoring at its finest to this fiasco, claiming they tripled their revenue in the previous year “despite a massive tariff and no incentives” (but admits that the reduction in tax incentive nearly doubles the cost of their vehicles.)
commented 2017-07-26 00:44:40 -0400
Electric cars with their toxic batteries that last at best 7 years is just another problem: who is going to recycle or remove the toxic heavy metals from depleted batteries?

You can go, hopefully, two hundred kilometres on a charge, less if it is a very cold or a very hot day. Then spend hours recharging. At best Montreal to Barrie is three days because of charging instead of six hours.

On the one hand we are told (not asked) to reduce our electrical consumption because the grid can only provide so much power. With electrical cars being charged, won’t that put a greater strain on the system?

What generates the power for these cars? Oh, usually a method that releases carbon dioxide. So there will be lots of CO2 generated for these CO2 free cars. Oops!

Some believe hydrogen powered cars is the way to go. Sorry, but it takes a great deal of electricity to pull hydrogen from H2O (water), so again there is a strain on CO2 producing power.

Of course, atomic energy would be the solution for generating electricity, but no. It isn’t PC enough. And the grid doesn’t have much more ability to handle greater loads.

Electric cars will be great during power outages. Even without a blackout, if you don’t have indoor parking, it will be difficult to charge a car if it is left outside during winter. Fifty kilometres might be the best you could get, less heating and waiting in stalled traffic.

We have been told electric cars are the way of the future. We were also told that the Nehru jacket was the way of the future. Guess not.
commented 2017-07-26 00:29:58 -0400
Oh, and another question … Where do we dispose of all of these huge used and useless toxic batteries from the electric vehicles. Isn’t that also environmental damage?
commented 2017-07-26 00:26:28 -0400
Derek, the point of the opposition to these charging stations is that the environmental “expense” of generating the additional needed electricity to charge the vehicles would off-set any perceived diminished CO2 gains by people switching to the electric vehicle technology.

This and also, would people go for the electric vehicles when:
1) they cost so much more than a gas/diesel of the same type
2) the distance on a charge is half or less than the fossil fuel equivalent vehicle
3) the cost of charging the vehicle per km vs. the cost per km for gas/diesel. Is the electricity more?
4) would the current electric grid handle the extra load needed to deliver energy to the new charging stations? And if not, who pays for the replacement/upgrade to the current infrastructure … the tax payer?

Just some basic questions.
commented 2017-07-26 00:16:16 -0400
Tammie, those are some really good questions.

Andrew is really hot for the green energy tech but it appears she does not live the green life style she pushes on all of us. Makes me wonder why.

The thing is that for me, if there was a viable alternative to the oil and gas based tech at an affordable price, I would jump on it, but all this solar and wind tech is at this point in history all garbage. And it has to be business that spawns that tech, not government, otherwise it will never be affordable nor reliable. Government simply is no good at business.
commented 2017-07-25 23:04:30 -0400
I have commented before regarding electric cars and I believe that in just about all the cases TheRebel is right in criticizing the Trudeau liberals for its policies but in this case, regarding the installation of Level 3 (above 240 volts using Direct Current at high amperage) charging stations on the TCH across Canada, it is a good idea.

All you have to do is listen to what the motor car manufacturers are saying about electric cars: they are bringing new models to the market at an ever increasing rate. So wouldn’t it be smart for the Feds to build out these charging stations so that Canadians can use their electric cars to cross this country without having to go through the States.

In the picture of the Tesla at a charging station at the head of this article, I would like to point out that this is occurring at a Tesla owned and operated Supercharging station. This is no cost to Tesla owners of the Model S and Model X for using these stations. It is part of what you get for your money… free charging. They are building these stations at an ever increasing rate however, they are for Tesla cars only.
commented 2017-07-25 22:44:54 -0400
Peter Netterville said in part, “Andrew, do you own and use an all electric car?”
Peter, she won’t answer, I have asked this of her a couple of times, with other questions about her EV…silence.
Most recent is from July 16 I said, “Andrew,How much did you spend on your EV? How much is your electricity bill to charge your EV? Have you every been stranded? How well does your EV perform during winter? Can your EV keep up with the demands of using heat or air conditioning & add the radio and windshield wipers? Have you ever taken a lengthy road trip in your EV?”

So, later in the same thread, I posted, “Andrew Stephenson, I have posted the questions below in previous threads and you haven’t provided any answers. I’m pretty confident your arguments are based on theoretical ownership of an EV, on paper your EV is reliable, is it?!”
commented 2017-07-25 22:24:58 -0400
Andrew, do you own and use an all electric car?

Andrew, do you live in a house power completely by solar/wind energy?

If no, then why not? You push that technology as the best in the universe so you must have first hand experience on how utterly perfect it is.

Please, tell us all how your life is the perfect model of all thing green technology.
commented 2017-07-25 20:22:31 -0400
Bill,

You’re right, about Thessalon, anyway. You’ll have to go to Blind River. Couple chargers in Timmins and in Smiths Falls.
commented 2017-07-25 20:06:07 -0400
Heh, no charging stations in Timmins or Smith falls or Thessalon – no rich Liberal snots there – although the hard working blue collar people in these locals are subsidizing rich Toronto liberal with their taxes.

Class bigotry writ large
commented 2017-07-25 19:54:07 -0400
Electric bike (scooters) sell big around here and are about the only practical e-motorized transport = no subsidies there – I guess there were no e-bike makers at Wynne’s pay to play $5k/per plate dinners
commented 2017-07-25 19:00:16 -0400
Great report Brian Lilley.
commented 2017-07-25 18:55:49 -0400
Ah,who doesn’t like government telling you how to spend your money (when they’re not busy taking it)?
commented 2017-07-25 18:16:55 -0400
“Peter Netterville commented 35 mins ago
That $20,000 difference from the Jetta vs. the Volt would pay for all the gas for the life of the car and more.

Andrew, give it up. 0.5% X 2 (assuming your comment is not the usual BS) is 1% of sales. "

The 1% number refers to all vehicle sales, nationally, but since there are not yet any electric trucks (etc) if you need one, it will be gas. In that case, it’s not the supposed inferiority of EVs holding down sales … it’s that there are not trucks. (I apologize, I had a brain fart. 4% applies to BC and Quebec, Ontario’s a bit lower yet. )
commented 2017-07-25 17:38:15 -0400
And a Jetta is better built and has better off-the-lot resale that the Volt … by far.
commented 2017-07-25 17:37:05 -0400
That $20,000 difference from the Jetta vs. the Volt would pay for all the gas for the life of the car and more.

Andrew, give it up. 0.5% X 2 (assuming your comment is not the usual BS) is 1% of sales.
commented 2017-07-25 17:25:20 -0400
Your “unpopular” EVS are now just under 4% of passenger vehicle sales in Ontario. They’ve doubled since you wrote that column and continue to grow.
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