July 31, 2019

Climate skeptics are welcome in Trump's America: Here's what they talk about (GUEST: Tom Harris)

Sheila Gunn ReidRebel Host | The Gunn Show


Great things are happening in the American oil and gas sector. They're in the midst of a boom.

South of the border, our American friends are drilling, pumping, building pipelines and exporting like never before, while here in Canada it can take a decade just to get to “no” on a pipeline.

But the fossil fuel industry isn't just the only thing booming and being liberated from government regulation in the United States.

The ability to freely discuss fossil fuels and their effect on the environment is also exploding under President Trump:

Unlike in Canada, where our moral and intellectual superiors in government and at the state broadcaster scold climate change skeptics as uneducated rubes, prominent figures and scientists can have dissenting opinions on man-made global warming without being run off the airwaves and run out of a job.

My guest tonight is Tom Harris of the International Climate Science Coalition. He's fresh off one of those rigorous discussions they're allowed to have in the United States - the 13th Annual Heartland International Conference on Climate Change.

He joins me to talk about the success of that conference held at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, DC.

Comments
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commented 2019-08-14 13:13:31 -0400 · Flag
Here’s one parting thought, “duke”.

Bacteria are not considered parasites, as the term is usually reserved for eukaryotes. Yet, bacterial infection can be fairly described as a parasitic relationship, where one organism benefits to the detriment of the other. A parasitic disease (which is fairy specifically defined) is semantically distinct from parasitic ecological niches (which has a very general definition, and purely on a cost-benefit basis between an organism and its host).

I realize that your worldview demands strictly literal and absolute definitions, as well as deference to authority, but they serve the real world with its many shades of grey, very poorly. A little bit of individual judgement goes a long way. Science is constantly changing and thrives on challenging dogma rather than accepting it blindly.
commented 2019-08-14 12:55:01 -0400
“And yet you don’t. So why don’t you? "

I did. The two citations you refer to in the next paragraph.

“I found some, so it’s clearly not “none”.
-——————————————
You found two (count ’em, two) whole papers -not published books as used as text books in med schools. "

Peer reviewed literature is the gold standard for information. Textbooks are derived from the literature and should not be considered comprehensive.

“Where do they say I’m wrong?”

They don’t. They don’t provide any material support for your perspective either, and relatively little for mine. We must rely on our own judgement sometimes. Let’s not get caught up trying to appeal to authority, as they clearly don’t spend a lot of time worrying this question. A book about ascariasis is about as useful for defining pregnancy as a car service manual is for learning about the chemistry of combusion. Tangentially related, but fundamentally separate topics.

My argument was presented below. Do you find it incorrect, and why?
commented 2019-08-14 12:48:17 -0400
"
DUKE OF PADUCAH commented 2 days ago
“Strange that not one of the books lists them as parasites. I gave you several hundred books. "

It’s not strange, you picked them that way.
—————————————
Nonsense. I just went to the net and pulled up books on parasitology. The reason for that was you said there was very little study done and very little literature in the field. In 10 minutes I found all those books so that is only a small portion of what has been written int he last 100 years. You are wrong again and as usual you won’t admit you were wrong. "

Do any of them address the question being asked? When I said that I mean the specific question, as to whether pregnancy was a de-facto parasitic relationship. Which, I will point out, hasn’t really been studied in an empirical manner, as it’s a philosophical question. I could Google a list of books about pregnancy, which similarly would say nothing. It means very little unless the question we’re debating is direclty being asked.

“Again this is your job MR-PhD-in-Science. Not mine. If there is any speculation it is on your side, You can provide no other medical expert who supports your position. Absence of evidence is still absence of evidence. "

We’re on even ground on that one. You can’t find any experts who explicitly support your position either.

{"And you are arrogant enough to believe that Doctors who are specialists in the field are “speculating”. Your arrogance is only exceeded by ignorance. "

I’m saying you’re speculating. Nobody asked them the question of whether pregnancy could be considered parasitic. We have no idea what their answer would be. It’s speculative to presume we do know.

“Here is the Encylopedia Brittannica on Scientific method. It show the reponsibility for proof on the part of the proponent. "

I presented my evidence earlier. You refuse to critique it.

’They have said you are wrong by inference since they do not call babies parasites. Where do they say you are correct?"

No. They call roundworms parasites. Their opinion on babies is unknown. You can infer whatever you want from nothing, but that’s not positive evidence.
commented 2019-08-11 17:07:28 -0400 · Flag
To recap:
1. there is no scientific evidence to support your theory.
2. this is seen in the lack of expert support for your position.
3. It is your responsibility to prove your hypothesis not my responsibility to disprove it.
commented 2019-08-11 17:07:07 -0400 · Flag
Your argument is pretty flimsy if you have to resort to the claim that thousands of medical professionals all overlooked something as obvious as this.

If you want to show it is, you only need search until you find it.
-————————-
And yet you don’t. So why don’t you?

Again, this is something that demands some sort of positive evidence on your end.


I find it hard to believe you are this much of an idiot. Obviously they can’t say you are wrong if you haven’t talked to them. They have said you are wrong by inference since they do not call babies parasites. Where do they say you are correct? That is the question. And obviously they don’t or you would have no problem finding medical textbooks that state it so be so.

Which still doesn’t answer the question. Why do you think you are more of an expert than someone who has made this a life time study? Why can’t you answer a question directly instead of doing the Trudeau diversion?
You haven’t provided much evidence.
-————-
No, only several hundred textbooks and long lists of parasites that prove the field is well studied and written about. and that nowhere are babies considered to be parasites by experts in the field. But then they “overlooked” it. They didn’t over look the smallest amoeba but hey overlooked a 5 round baby.

You have provided next to nothing.

…as the precise definition of “parasitism” is abstract and subjective…
-—————-
Funny you have been arguing all along that the definition is quite precise and that babies fit into it. You always default to subjectivism when you can’t support your claims.

I’d argue that Santa Claus is not a suitable analogy…
-————————-

Of course you would since it shows your method to be specious at best.

The analogy is perfectly fitting. What you are trying to prove is irrelevant. Absence of evidence of babies being parasites is the same as absence of evidence of the existence of Santa Claus. Absence of evidence is absence of evidence. Doesn’t matter what you are trying to prove. Good attempt at diversion though.

Which brings us again to the old question, why do you work so hard to believe and promulgate lies when doing so makes you a laughingstock on the world stage?

But thanks again for demonstrating the Third pillar of Leftiedom- the refusal to exercise discernment.

“Discernment is the ability to judge which things of a particular kind are good and which are bad.”

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/discernment
commented 2019-08-11 17:06:45 -0400
Your argument is pretty flimsy if you have to resort to the claim that thousands of medical professionals all overlooked something as obvious as this.

If you want to show it is, you only need search until you find it.
-————————-
And yet you don’t. So why don’t you?

Again, this is something that demands some sort of positive evidence on your end.
-————————-
Nope. It demands it on your end and you don’t have it. I have no obligation to do your job as a “scientist”. I’m not proposing a hypothesis, you are. Hard to understand, I know, but do try.

I found some, so it’s clearly not “none”.
-——————————————
You found two (count ’em, two) whole papers -not published books as used as text books in med schools.

Doesn’t matter. I found supporting evidence. IF you want to show something isn’t there, you have to look everywhere (which is, obviously, impossible) .
-————————
And yet this is what you are demanding that I do on your behalf…

If you want to show it is, you only need search until you find it.
-———————
I have no responsibility to find anything in a case where a"scientist" is making a hypothesis. The responsibility is on the scientist.

Where do they say I’m wrong?
commented 2019-08-11 16:47:32 -0400 · Flag
Your argument is pretty flimsy if you have to resort to the claim that thousands of medical professionals all overlooked something as obvious as this.

If you want to show it is, you only need search until you find it.
-————————-
And yet you don’t. So why don’t you?

Again, this is something that demands some sort of positive evidence on your end.
-————————-
Nope. It demands it on your end and you don’t have it. I have no obligation to do your job as a “scientist”. I’m not proposing a hypothesis, you are. Hard to understand, I know, but do try.

I found some, so it’s clearly not “none”.
-——————————————
You found two (count ’em, two) whole papers -not published books as used as text books in med schools.

Doesn’t matter. I found supporting evidence. IF you want to show something isn’t there, you have to look everywhere (which is, obviously, impossible) .
-————————
And yet this is what you are demanding that I do on your behalf…

If you want to show it is, you only need search until you find it.
-———————
commented 2019-08-11 16:46:09 -0400 · Flag
“The scientific method is critical to the development of scientific theories, which explain empirical (experiential) laws in a scientifically rational manner. In a typical application of the scientific method, a researcher DEVELOPS A HYPOTHESIS, TESTS IT THROUGH various means, and then MODIFIES THE HYPOTHESIS on the basis of the outcome of the tests and experiments. The modified hypothesis is then RETESTED, further MODIFIED, and TESTED AGAIN, until it BECOMES CONSISTENT WITH OBSERVED PHENOMENA AND TESTING OUTCOMES. In this way, hypotheses serve as tools by which scientists gather data.In this way, hypotheses serve as tools by which scientists gather data.
And here is the crux of our discussion:

BECOMES CONSISTENT WITH OBSERVED PHENOMENA AND TESTING OUTCOMES.

Your theory is not consistent with observed phenomenas and outcomes. You have not done any of this. Especially not the capitalized part given here. You have simply proposed a hypothesis (more of theory, really) and demand that the world accept it as fact even though it has no evidence and it is weakly argued. Absence of evidence is not proof. You know this but you want to believe its and ignore what doesn’t suit your theory.

Something is not true simply because it hasn’t been shown to be false. You know- like Santa Claus.

Your responsibility is to show that other EXPERTS- not armchair “scientists” agree with you. This is the crux of our discussion- that other experts agree with you. They don’t or there would be huge output of books and such to that effect.

That’s the danger of “absence of evidence” arguments, “duke”. “I can’t find an example” is instantly refuted by… finding an example. Which I did.
-————————
One speculative paper is hardly as compelling as 10,000 books that make no mention it. Funny that 1,000 books are not convincing but one paper is. Shows how desperately you are seeking comforting lies.

Again, this is something that demands some sort of supportive evidence on your end
and you should have no problem finding them. But I forgot these thousands of medical professionals “overlooked” the possibility because they aren’t as smart as you are. Even the entire team at the Center for Disease Control.

DO YOU SERIOUSLY THINK THESE PEOPLE ARE THAT STUPID AND THAT YOU ARE SMARTER THAN ALL OF THEM?
commented 2019-08-11 16:44:33 -0400 · Flag
“Strange that not one of the books lists them as parasites. I gave you several hundred books. "

It’s not strange, you picked them that way.
-—————————————-
Nonsense. I just went to the net and pulled up books on parasitology. The reason for that was you said there was very little study done and very little literature in the field. In 10 minutes I found all those books so that is only a small portion of what has been written int he last 100 years. You are wrong again and as usual you won’t admit you were wrong.

Instead you try to divert the issue to one on the whether or not they address the question. That was not the point, O Deceitful one. The point was that you said there was very little studied or written. There have been MILLIONS of pages written which obviously means it has been widely studied.

Do they actually address the question? If not, what they think is pure speculation.
-———————————-
Again this is your job MR-PhD-in-Science. Not mine. If there is any speculation it is on your side, You can provide no other medical expert who supports your position. Absence of evidence is still absence of evidence.

And you are arrogant enough to believe that Doctors who are specialists in the field are “speculating”. Your arrogance is only exceeded by ignorance.

Here is the Encylopedia Brittannica on Scientific method. It show the reponsibility for proof on the part of the proponent.
The scientific method is critical to the development of scientific theories, which explain empirical (experiential) laws in a scientifically rational manner. In a typical application of the scientific method, a researcher develops a hypothesis, tests it through various means, and then modifies the hypothesis on the basis of the outcome of the tests and experiments. The modified hypothesis is then retested, further modified, and tested again, until it becomes consistent with observed phenomena and testing outcomes. In this way, hypotheses serve as tools by which scientists gather data.

“The scientific method is critical to the development of scientific theories, which explain empirical (experiential) laws in a scientifically rational manner. In a typical application of the scientific method, a researcher DEVELOPS A HYPOTHESIS, TESTS IT THROUGH various means, and then MODIFIES THE HYPOTHESIS on the basis of the outcome of the tests and experiments. The modified hypothesis is then RETESTED, further MODIFIED, and TESTED AGAIN, until it BECOMES CONSISTENT WITH OBSERVED PHENOMENA AND TESTING OUTCOMES. In this way, hypotheses serve as tools by which scientists gather data.In this way, hypotheses serve as tools by which scientists gather data.
commented 2019-08-10 15:00:11 -0400
DUKE OF PADUCAH commented 13 hours ago
And just to be certain- you are saying that the authors of all those books and the medical clinics and doctors who work there are complete nincompoops who never thought thought look at a baby as a parasite?”

“As the “scientist” presenting a hypothesis it is your job to do that, not me. "

Do they actually address the question? If not, what they think is pure speculation.

I supported my hypothesis. What is your critique of it? I’d like something a bit more compelling than pointing to a book about something else which inevitably says nothing about it.

“Strange that not one of the books lists them as parasites. I gave you several hundred books. "

It’s not strange, you picked them that way.

“So one book out of 10,000 would prove your point? Don’t be stupid”

That’s the danger of “absence of evidence” arguments, “duke”.. “I can’t find an example” is instantly refuted by… finding an example. Which I did.

“Very unlikely since it has been a field of medical science for a hundred years with millions of pages written on it. None of them mention or list it which is highly suspicious given the 140,000,000 births every year”

I found some, so it’s clearly not “none”.

“And how many have you read? It is not my job to prove your hypothesis. It is your task. So be a good little scientist and do it. "

Doesn’t matter. I found supporting evidence. IF you want to show something isn’t there, you have to look everywhere (which is, obviously, impossible) . If you want to show it is, you only need search until you find it.

Again, this is something that demands some sort of positive evidence on your end.

“You still think you know more than the hundreds of authors in the field of parasitology? That is why you ignore the question: ’

Where do they say I’m wrong?

“You have ignored all evidence from recognized authorities and provide nothing”

You haven’t provided much evidence. Again, unless they actually tell you their opinion, you have no idea what they think of something. Not bringing it up is often simply a matter of brevity.

I’d argue that Santa Claus is not a suitable analogy, as the precise definition of “parasitism” is abstract and subjective, distinct from whether a physical entity exists or not.
commented 2019-08-10 01:35:13 -0400 · Flag
And just to be certain- you are saying that the authors of all those books and the medical clinics and doctors who work there are complete nincompoops who never thought thought look at a baby as a parasite?
commented 2019-08-10 01:32:58 -0400 · Flag
ANDREW STEPHENSON

Have you asked all of them what they think about this particular claim?
-———————-
As the “scientist” presenting a hypothesis it is your job to do that, not me. Remember, “peer review” and all that? Why have provided no evidence that any medical authority agrees with you. Absence of evidence is absence of evidence. Why do you think you can turn a negative into a positive by providing no evidence?

Which of them says that fetuses aren’t in a parasitic relationship with their mother? Like, overtly says it.
-————-
A better question is how many are there that do? NONE. That’s because babies do not fit he medical definition of parasite obviously.

What if you simply missed the book that actually confirms my point?
-——————————
Strange that not one of the books lists them as parasites. I gave you several hundred books. It is your task to prove your hypothesis and you haven’t done it. Opinion is not fact. Prove it.

I guess you didn’t read this part very carefully:

“Then, to prove a negative, we only have to show that it is very likely the case and we don’t have to show it is true with absolute certainty.”

I have given you hundreds of books and dozens of lists from medical authorities that say nothing about babies as parasites. So it is “very likely” that the negative is proven. You have given nothing.

What if you simply missed the book that actually confirms my point?
-————————-
So one book out of 10,000 would prove your point? Don’t be stupid. You’re the one making the hypothesis so it incumbent on you to prove it. Not me.

How likely is it a priori that a statement is true?
-———
Given the lack of evidence it is not likely.

And how likely is it that there would be no evidence if the statement was true?
-———————-
Very unlikely since it has been a field of medical science for a hundred years with millions of pages written on it. None of them mention or list it which is highly suspicious given the 140,000,000 births every year.

I agree. What’s puzzling is how you’ve ignored my attempt to do exactly that.
-————————
What’s puzzling is that you have done nothing of the sort and think you have. You have ignored all evidence from recognized authorities and provide nothing. Absence of evidence is absence of evidence. You have made a ludicrous hypothesis is all. Next step is to test it. After that is to repeat it and then submit it for peer review. You’ve got step one.

What proportion of the literature space have you actually read in detail?
-————————
And how many have you read? It is not my job to prove your hypothesis. It is your task. So be a good little scientist and do it.

You still think you know more than the hundreds of authors in the field of parasitology? That is why you ignore the question:

So “Andrew”, why do you skip the part about your lie about the number of books and studies on the topic?"

Again, Why did you skip that part? How about answering my question instead of rambling on with more of your BS. Simply answer the question asked. Or are you following the leftist lead of Trudeau?

What you are providing is another example of the Third Pillar of Leftiedom- the refusal to exercise discernment or it’s allies, logic and reason. You could do with a good course in philosophy and reasoning. Wouldn’t hurt to focus on logic, either.

Your demand for absolute certainty is impossible in any area of life.

So by your reasoning we will have to allow for the existence of Santa Claus- which you also conveniently ignored since it would show your demand to be idiotic.

Its about probabilities not absolute certainty. If you want it, you provide it but you know you can’t so you demand it of me who is not making that particular “truth” claim.

The ball is your court, not mine. If you can’t do your job stop yapping about it. Or just admit you’re wrong. But I realize that is difficult for someone with a god-complex.
commented 2019-08-09 00:46:24 -0400 · Flag
“No one in any authoritative position even mentions them”

Have you asked all of them what they think about this particular claim?

“What do they become? A dog?”

In the Acanthamoeba case, free living Acanthamoeba. They rarely engage in parasitic relationships. If you’re going to include anything that could possibly ever be parasitic as a “parasite”, even if that’s not its natural state, then I will simply point to “fetus-in-fetu”, aka “parasitic twin”. It’s rare, but probably more common than acanthamoebiasis.

“So you need to decide two things: How likely is it a priori that a statement is true? And how likely is it that there would be no evidence if the statement was true? From these two you can figure out how likely the statement is false if there is no evidence. :

I agree. What’s puzzling is how you’ve ignored my attempt to do exactly that.

“Given that you know so little about the field, why should I give any credence to your views on it? "

You lend credence to a site which currently has, on its front page, a claim that endothermy is evidence of a creator. Why not me? I’m at least as reputable as they are.
commented 2019-08-09 00:39:33 -0400
Duke of Paducah commented 6 hours ago
So “Andrew”, why do you skip the part about your lie about the number of books and studies on the topic?"

Which of them says that fetuses aren’t in a parasitic relationship with their mother? Like, overtly says it. A book about tropical diseases is fascinating, but pregnancy isn’t a tropical disease, so I doubt they address the point at all. Or do they?

“Then, to prove a negative, we only have to show that it is very likely the case and we don’t have to show it is true with absolute certainty.”

So, show it, then. I mean, directly. Not by picking a list of books and saying, look, it’s not in here. What if you simply missed the book that actually confirms my point? What proportion of the literature space have you actually read in detail?

“In other words, this research shows that pregnancy is not a competition between the rights of mother and child (as abortion advocates would have us believe).”"

The core hypothesis of the paper they cite, (Sferruzzi-Perri et al (2016), Maternal and fetal genomes interplay through phosphoinositol 3-kinase(PI3K)-p110α signaling to modify placental resource allocation, PNAS 113 (40) 11255-11260) is that this competition is real, and that the gene in question, p110(alpha), is a mechanism to balance it out! Nor do they claim that nutrients flow both ways. In fact, the pups born to the wild-type mice are larger than those in the heterozygotes, inferring that this gene actually increases the burden of pregnancy! It is unclear how your site got from there to the claims they made as they don’t seem to be supported by the cited source.

Further, the idea that this refutes the “fetus as parasite” hypothesis appears to originate in the Reasons To Believe author, based, again, apparently on not really understanding the paper.
commented 2019-08-08 19:14:20 -0400
Evidence is not proof. Proof is not absolute certainty. Your demand is unreasonable in the world of philosophy. However the world of sophistry you can have at ’er.


“If to “prove” a something we simply have to provide sufficient evidence that a proposition (statement or claim) is very likely true.
Then, to prove a negative, we only have to show that it is very likely the case and we don’t have to show it is true with absolute certainty.
Under those conditions, we DO NOT have to observe empirically that which cannot be observed (for example, we don’t have to see a Unicorn not existing to know it doesn’t exist, we just have to show compelling evidence of its non-existence).

http://factmyth.com/factoids/you-cant-prove-a-negative/
-————————
But, no doubt, your expertise in philosophy and logic (lol) will find a way to ignore this as well. When you desperately seek lies then no amount of evidence will be sufficient.
commented 2019-08-08 19:07:23 -0400
You are so arrogant that you think that your “independent thought”, which is held by basically no one- even those who are experts in their fields – even hundreds of them and millions of pages or written materials stand no chance against your sophistry. You truly do have a god-complex.

Why are you so desperate to hold to such ludicrous idea that has virtually no support among experts in the field? Why are you are willing to look like a complete idiot in front of the whole world?

Thinking in isolation and with pride ends in being an idiot.
– G. K. Chesterton

Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.
– G. K. Chesterton

Men do not differ much about what things they will call evils; they differ enormously about
what evils they will call excusable.
– G. K. Chesterton

You can only find truth with logic if you have already found truth without it.
– G. K. Chesterton

Merely having an open mind is nothing; the object of opening the mind, as of opening the
mouth, is to shut it again on something solid.
– G. K. Chesterton

When men choose not to believe in God, they do not thereafter believe in nothing, they then
become capable of believing in anything.
– G. K. Chesterton Desperately seeking comforting lies. Why do you seek them? Why do you want other people to believe them? Trying to justify the abortion you had, maybe?
commented 2019-08-08 19:06:45 -0400
Try this one:

Definition of Occam’s razor
: a scientific and philosophical rule that entities should not be multiplied unnecessarily which is interpreted as requiring that the simplest of competing theories be preferred to the more complex or that explanations of unknown phenomena BE SOUGHT FIRST IN TERMS OF KNOWN QUANTITIES

And, you still haven’t told me where my logic went wrong. Is the fetus-mother relationship not beneficial to fetus/taxing to mother, and is this not a parasitic relationship?
-———————-

Again, I’lll let the expert answer this even though you will dismiss it with more of your sophistry.

“A study out of Cambridge University is shining light on the role the placenta plays in “ensur[ing] optimal health for both the mother and the fetus,” writes Dr. Fazale Rana of Reasons To Believe. Rana describes a “potential tug of war” that could theoretically happen between the mother and her preborn baby when it comes to the need for nutrients. But in reality, this doesn’t happen — thanks to the regulatory effects of the placenta. The placenta develops from cells belonging to the developing preborn child (blastocyst) after implanting into the wall of the uterus (between 5 and 8 days after fertilization):

Instead of being passive tissue that absorbs available nutrients from the mother, the placenta dynamically distributes nutrients between mother and fetus, optimally ensuring the health of both mother and developing baby… [by] receiv[ing] metabolic signals from both the mother and fetus and respond[ing] to this input by regulating the nutrient amounts made available to the fetus.

In other words, this research shows that pregnancy is not a competition between the rights of mother and child (as abortion advocates would have us believe)."
commented 2019-08-08 19:05:46 -0400
No, parasites are not parasites through all their life cycle.
-—————————-
Yes they are. They may not behave parasitically but they remain a parasite regardless of their activity. What do they become? A dog? It’s hard to believe anyone would promulgate anything this obviously illogical and stupid. Your sophistry knows no bounds but you are in good company. Leftists are always screwing around with the definitions of words.

Where is the evidence of absence?
-———————————————————

I just gave you the evidence of absence. Pages of it. It ain’t there. Just like Santa Claus ain’t there. No one in any authoritative position even mentions them. Not even the Center for Disease Control in their loooooong list which would be considered comprehensive by anyone who isn’t desperately seeking lies.. How much more evidence do you need?

Repeat after me, “duke”: Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
-—————-
“Andrew”, so are you saying we cannot definitively say there is no Santa Claus? We have no evidence but lots of claims to the affirmative. Evidence of absence is asking to prove a negative. If it isn’t there how can you prove it? You prove it by its’ absence.

Go into your kitchen. Is there an elephant? In this case, absence of evidence is evidence of absence. You know that if there was an elephant, you would have evidence. No evidence, no elephant.

But is there a mouse? It is quite possible that there is a mouse but no evidence.

So you need to decide two things: How likely is it a priori that a statement is true? And how likely is it that there would be no evidence if the statement was true? From these two you can figure out how likely the statement is false if there is no evidence.
commented 2019-08-08 18:11:33 -0400 · Flag
Given that you know so little about the field, why should I give any credence to your views on it?
commented 2019-08-08 17:49:05 -0400 · Flag
So “Andrew”, why do you skip the part about your lie about the number of books and studies on the topic? Care to admit you were wrong as I so easily pointed out? Probably not because you refuse to read, or accept any evidence that is contrary to your position of lying. This is you believing and promulgating lies. The question is why do you wanna to do so?
commented 2019-08-08 12:19:50 -0400 · Flag
Repeat after me, “duke”: Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

Where is the evidence of absence? Can you find someone that says, specifically, that you’re right?



And, you still haven’t told me where my logic went wrong. Is the fetus-mother relationship not beneficial to fetus/taxing to mother, and is this not a parasitic relationship?
commented 2019-08-08 12:16:41 -0400
“Because parasites remain parasites throughout their life cycle. They change form sometimes but they never become anything other than a parasite. By your reasoning then all babies remain parasites at all stages and we should kill them all off at any age. In other words we would destroy the human race. Parasites do not become a different species. Neither do babies. "

No, parasites are not parasites through all their life cycle. The very first item on your list, Acanthamoeboid infections, are fully opportunistic. Acanthamoeba spp protozoa are free-living, and primarily so. They live in biofilms, graze on bacteria, and divide via mitosis every six hours or so, and will happily do so without ever encountering something to parasitize. They are literally everywhere. Yet, acanthemoebiasis is extremely rare. They’re accidental pathogens, and not very good at it even then (they do far better in their natural environment than as “parasites”). In fact, the bacteria that parasitize the protozoa are usually more of a problem than the protozoa themselves.. Yet, included on your list of parasites.

Even obligate parasites, those which need it, often have free-living forms for the sake of dispersal. There are a few that do indeed never leave either the vector or the host, but that’s not actually that common.

“We’ve covered this before but you conveniently ignore it. Why? Because you want to believe and promulgate lies. Why you do is a mystery.
\
I haven’t ignored it. I’ve pointed out why I disagree. You have yet to refute it, instead repeating the original accusation.
commented 2019-08-08 12:03:24 -0400
"
What a joke. You state that the list I provided- that is pages long- is not complete enough to establish that humans babies are not parasites. Now you find two excerpts online that are incomplete and one of which uses the parasite as an analogy not a literal parasite. That’s the best you can do? "

And the other?

I found a gap in your list. Thus, it is not complete, and thus, omission of something else is not meaningful.

Do you have anything that positively confirms your hypothesis? That one of your sources doesn’t bother to mention it, doesn’t mean much.

“I think I have show more evidence than you have by a long shot. But at least you are now making an attempt. But you have found no medical body that supports your view, as in say, textbook form that is taught in med school. You have found tangential connections that hardly support your view. You are still desperately seeking comforting lies. "

Certainly, in length, you’ve put up there. Given how many exist, you could go on for days yet and still only scratch the surface. You do not have medical body support either. We are forced to go off the beaten path here and think for ourselves.

I reiterate, absence of a particular item from a list doesn’t mean much. I return to the mathematical analogy – what’s a better way to define odd numbers, by listing them all (impossible), or by defining, specifically, the property that renders a number even or odd.

And to that end, I posit that, given that pregnancy is a physically interpendent relationship, that benefits one at the expense of the other. Would that be fair to define as a parasitic relationship? (or, is it analogous to one?)
commented 2019-08-08 10:38:04 -0400 · Flag
The question remains. You are obviously lying. You obviously want to believe lies. You obviously want others to believe the same moronic lies that you do.Why do want to believe and promulgate lies?
commented 2019-08-08 02:07:11 -0400
Millions, hmm? No, this is not something that is well studied at all. In fact there’s very little on Pubmed. You;‘re trying to appeal to a burden of wisdom that simply doesn’t exist.
-———————
I’ve provided a hell of a lot more than you have. Here is short list of those books containing information on parasites that you say is not well studied at all:

“I’m often asked by students to suggest books they can read about parasites. Below is a list of books that I’ve read and enjoyed. The list will be updated over time. Please feel free to suggest books that I should add to the list in the comments.

Textbooks or textbook-like books

Parasitism: The Ecology and Evolution of Intimate Interactions by Claude Combes

Parasites and the Behavior of Animals by Janice Moore

Host Manipulation by Parasites edited by David Hughes, Jacques Brodeur, and Frédéric Thomas

Foundations of Parasitology (textbook) by Larry Roberts and John Janovy Jr.

Evolutionary Parasitology by Paul Schmid-Hempel

Evolutionary Ecology of Parasites by Robert Poulin

Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases: the Neglected Tropical Diseases and their Impact on Global Health and Development by Peter J. Hotez

Parasitism and Ecosystems edited by Frédéric Thomas, François Renaud, and Jean-François Guégan (thanks to Alex Ley for reminding me to include this great book)

More pop sci-esque parasite books

Parasite Rex: Inside the Bizarre World of Nature’s Most Dangerous Creatures by Carl Zimmer

This book played a huge role in my decision to become a parasitologist. Highly recommend.

Riddled with Life: Friendly Worms, Ladybug Sex, and the Parasites That Make Us Who We Are by Marlene Zuk

Stories about how we become connected to our parasites through our long co-evolutionary history.

People, Parasites, and Plowshares by Dickson Despommier

This book is about one of my favorite topics: What have parasites “learned” through the process of natural selection about how human physiology works? How can we take the lessons these parasites have learned and use them to treat human disease?

Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen

Amazing stories of past and present parasites that jumped from wild hosts to human hosts. Also lots of stories about scientists being badasses.

The Malaria Capers: Tales of Parasites & People by Robert Desowitz

Robert Desowitz talks about his experiences working with parasites (particularly neglected tropical diseases), and the people infected with these parasites. He is an amazing story-teller, and really connects the reader with the human-suffering caused by these diseases.

New Guinea Tapeworms and Jewish Grandmothers: Tales of Parasites & People by Robert Desowitz

More stories from Robert Desowitz.

Smallpox: The Death of a Disease – The Inside Story of Eradicating a Worldwide Killer by D.A. Henderson

The mind-blowing story about how D.A. Henderson led the battle against smallpox, and all of the hurdles he had to jump through in order to eradicate this disease.

An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Disease by Moises Velasquez-Manoff

An extremely well-researched overview of the Hygiene Hypothesis. Moises Velasquez-Manoff provides a balanced view of the evidence for and against this hypothesis, and walks the reader through his experience with helminth therapy to treat his autoimmune diseases."

And some more:

Web Atlas of Medical Parasitology

Web Atlas of Medical Parasitology aims to provide educational materials for medical students primarily, but professional workers in medical or paramedical fields may also refer to this site covering the significant parasites in the world.

Author(s): The Korean Society for Parasitology

Parasitology by Dr. Michele M. Klingbeil

Parasites are still an important threat to our global health and economy, and represent an important branch of infectious diseases. This note is designed to provide students of microbiology and biology with a basic understanding of classical and modern parasitology.

Author(s): Dr. Michele M. Klingbeil

WormBook

WormBook is a comprehensive online review of C. elegans biology, containing over 100 original, peer-reviewed chapters on a wide range of topics related to the biology of C. elegans and related nematodes; as well as WormMethods, a collection of laboratory methods and protocols useful for nematode researchers.

Author(s): WormBook Research Community

Parasitology Lecture Notes Carter Center

This lecture note is devoted to providing general aspects of parasitology in addition to covering human parasites in two major groups -the protozoa and helminths including their distribution, habitat, morphology, life cycle, pathogenicity, prevention and control, laboratory diagnosis and their relevance to Ethiopia. It has also appendices, which discuss the collection of laboratory specimens, preservatives of stool sample, frequently used parasitological diagnostic methods and reagent preparation.

Author(s): Jimma University

Clinical Parasitology J Dick MacLean

This note covers the following topics: Taxonomy, Intestinal Protozoa, Entamoeba Histolytica, Amoebiasis, Amoebic Liver Abscess, Entamoeba Histolytica Or Dispar, Cyclospora Cayetanensis, Intestinal Protozoa Stains.

Author(s): J Dick MacLean

Parasitology by Mohammad Manjur Shah

Parasitology is an established discipline that covers a wide area of subjects, ranging from the basics to the advanced and applied aspects. The entire book is based on the findings of various studies performed by different authors, comprising reviews and original scientific papers. Topics covered includes: Tools for Trans-Splicing Drug Interference Evaluation in Kinetoplastid, Innovation of the Parasitic Cycle of Coccidioides spp, Biological Control of Parasites, Electrocardiography as a Diagnostic Method for Chagas Disease in Patients and Experimental Models, Soft Ticks as Pathogen Vectors: Distribution, Surveillance and Control,Parasitic Nematodes of some Insects from Manipur, India.

Author(s): Mohammad Manjur Shah

Basic Laboratory Methods in Medical Parasitology

This manual is a guide for laboratory workers. It explains the techniques to be used when examining faeces, blood, urine and other materials for the presence of parasites.

Author(s): World Health Organization

Diagnosing Medical Parasites A Public Health Officers Guide To Assisting Laboratory And Medical Officers

This book covers the following topics: The Ameba, The Ciliates, Coccidia, and Microsporidia, The Flagellates, The Cestodes (Tapeworms), The Nematodes (Roundworms), The Trematodes (Flukes), Unusual Tissue Dwelling Nematodes, Larval Cestodes and Nematodes which Infect Man, Malaria, The Blood Nematodes, Babesia, Trypanosomes, and Leishmania, Arthropod Vectors, Artifacts and Confounders.

Author(s): Michael J. Cuomo, Lawrence B. Noel and Daryl B. White

Medical Parasitology by Ethiopia Public Health Training Initiative

This lecture note is useful to student s of health science, medicine and other students and academicians. It is believed to provide basic knowledge to students on medical parasitology.

Author(s): Dawit Assafa, Ephrem Kibru, S. Nagesh, Solomon Gebreselassie, Fetene Deribe, Jemal Ali

Text Book of Human Parasitology

Human parasitology, an important part of parasitology, study the medical parasites including their morphology, life cycle, the relationship with host and environment. The objectives of this book is to study the way or the measurement of parasitic diseases control.

Author(s): Lu Gang

Veterinary Parasitology

This lab is an introduction to some techniques used by veterinarians to detect eggs, cysts, and larvae of parasites in the feces of animals. Proper use of the microscope is vital to these techniques.

Author(s): University of Pennsylvania

Introduction in medical parasitology and parasitic diseases

This book provides an introduction to medical parasitology and parasitic diseases.

Author(s): NA

Parasitology Research

This note describes the following topics: Coccidia of the World, Basic biology of Cryptosporidium, Animal and human parasite images, Commercial reagents for cryptosporidial research and Potential therapies for Cryptosporidium parvum.

Author(s): Kansas State University

Parasitology or Mycology Lecture Guide

This note deals with the subjects of clinical parasitology and medical mycology. It explains the following topics: Introduction to Parasitology, Nematodes, Cestodes, Trematodes, Intestinal Protozoa, Blood and Tissue Protozoa, Malaria, Arthropods and Mycology.

Author(s): Dale Dingley

Parasitology Online

This book describes the following topics: Intestinal Parasites: Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, Taeniarhynchus saginatus, Diphyllobothrium latum and Ascaris lumbricoides, Blood Parasites: Trypanosoma brucei subspecies, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium species and Schistosoma species, Tissue and Other Parasites: Leishmania species, Toxoplasma gondii, Fasciola hepatica, Onchocerca volvulus and Trichinella spiralis.

Laboratory Identification Of Parasites

Currently this section contains no detailed description for the page, will update this page soon.

Author(s): NA

Intestinal Parasites

This note covers the following topics: Intestinal Protozoa, Intestinal Helminths, Extra-Intestinal Parasites: Protozoa, Helminths, Arthropods.

Author(s): Don Lehman

Medical Parasitology (PDF 23P)

This note covers the following topics: Type of parasites, Nomenclature of parasites, Life cycle of parasites, Effects of Parasites on human body, Body reaction against parasites, Body syndromes against parasites and Treatment of parasitic disease.

Author(s): Kabul university

Introduction to Parasitology

This note covers the following topics: Veterinary Parasitology, Parasitism, The Spectrum of Parasitism, Ancylostomatoidea, Diptera (flies), Parasitic Diseases of Horses, Metastrongyloidea, Siphonaptera, Parasitic Diseases of Cattle, Rhabditoidea, Phthiraptera, Parasitic Diseases of Sheep and Goats, Ascaridoidea, Acarina – Mites, Parasitic Diseases of Dogs and Cats, Oxyuroidea, Acarina – Ticks , Parasiticides – the Anthelmintics, Trichuroidea, Introduction to Protozoa, Heartworm, , Spiruroidea, Amoebae, Immune Responses to Parasites and Filarioidea.

Author(s): NA

Domestic Rabbits Diseases and Parasites (PDF 31P)

This note describes the following topics: Factors in disease prevention and control, Bacterial diseases, Viral diseases, Fungal diseases, Parasitic diseases, Nutritional diseases and Hereditary diseases.

Author(s): A Pacific Northwest Extension Publication

Parasites: Tales of Humanity’s Most Unwelcome Guests puts amoebae, roundworms, tapeworms, mites, and others at the center of the action as human cultures have evolved and declined. It shows their role in exploration, war, and even terrorist plots , often through an unpredictable ripple effect.

Author: Rosemary Drisdelle

Protozoan Parasitism: From Omics to Prevention and Control Add to cart
Edited by: Luis Miguel de Pablos Torró and Jacob-Lorenzo Morales Published: 2018
Book: 978-1-910190-83-8. Ebook: 978-1-910190-84-5, £159, $319
Expert international authors review the current hot-topics in this area to provide an up-to-date overview. Essential reading! read more …
Full information at Protozoan Parasitism.
Molecular Biology of Kinetoplastid Parasites
Molecular Biology of Kinetoplastid Parasites Add to cart
Edited by: Hemanta K. Majumder Published: 2018
Book: 978-1-910190-71-5. Ebook: 978-1-910190-72-2, £159, $319
“I would therefore recommend this book” (Parasites and Vectors) read more …
Full information at Molecular Biology of Kinetoplastid Parasites.
Illustrated Dictionary of Parasitology in the Post-Genomic Era
Illustrated Dictionary of Parasitology in the Post-Genomic Era Add to cart
Author: Hany M. Elsheikha and Edward L. Jarroll Published: 2017
Book: 978-1-910190-67-8. Ebook: 978-1-910190-68-5, £159, $319
“a guide for students, academic staff, medical and veterinarian professionals” (ProtoView); “an extensive and comprehensive glossary of contemporary concepts, terminologies, and vocabulary in modern parasitology” (Doodys); “a pure pleasure to explore and discover” (Epidemiol. Infect.); “highly recommended” (Biotechnol. Agron. Soc. Environ.) read more …
Full information at Illustrated Dictionary of Parasitology in the Post-Genomic Era.
Brain-eating Amoebae: Biology and Pathogenesis of Naegleria fowleri
Brain-eating Amoebae: Biology and Pathogenesis of Naegleria fowleri Add to cart
Author: Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui, Ibne Karim M. Ali, Jennifer R. Cope and Naveed Ahmed Khan Published: 2016
Book: 978-1-910190-53-1. Ebook: 978-1-910190-54-8, £159, $319
“explains the current knowledge and research” (ProtoView) read more …
Full information at Brain-eating Amoebae.
Antibiotics: Current Innovations and Future Trends
Antibiotics: Current Innovations and Future Trends Add to cart
Edited by: Sergio Sánchez and Arnold L. Demain Published: 2015
Book: 978-1-908230-54-6. Ebook: 978-1-908230-55-3, £219, $360
“packed full of useful information” (MicroToday); “genuinely a brilliant resource” (ChemMedChem); “a useful resource” (Book News); “insightful reading” (Biospektrum); “I thoroughly recommend this textbook” (Aus. J. Med. Sci.) read more …
Full information at Antibiotics.
Leishmania: Current Biology and Control
Leishmania: Current Biology and Control Add to cart
Edited by: Subrata Adak and Rupak Datta Published: 2015
Book: 978-1-908230-52-2. Ebook: 978-1-908230-53-9, £199, $319
“an excellent reference” (Doodys); “a useful guide” (Fungal Diversity) read more …
Full information at Leishmania.
Acanthamoeba: Biology and Pathogenesis (2nd edition)
Acanthamoeba: Biology and Pathogenesis (2nd edition) Add to cart
Author: Naveed Ahmed Khan Published: 2015
Book: 978-1-908230-50-8. Ebook: 978-1-908230-51-5, £219, $319
“comprehensive review” (Book News); “comprehensive handbook … as well as an invaluable reference” (Fungal Diversity) read more …
Full information at Acanthamoeba.
Malaria Parasites: Comparative Genomics, Evolution and Molecular Biology
Malaria Parasites: Comparative Genomics, Evolution and Molecular Biology Add to cart
Edited by: Jane M. Carlton, Susan L. Perkins and Kirk W. Deitsch Published: 2013
Book: 978-1-908230-07-2. Ebook: 978-1-908230-76-8, £199, $319
“an essential and eminently accessible resource” (Parasites and Vectors) read more …
Full information at Malaria Parasites.
Stress Response in Microbiology
Stress Response in Microbiology Add to cart
Edited by: Jose M. Requena Published: 2012
Book: 978-1-908230-04-1, £219, $360
“well and sensibly illustrated” (Micro. Today); “well-written and informative” (Biospektrum) read more …
Full information at Stress Response in Microbiology.
Essentials of Veterinary Parasitology
Essentials of Veterinary Parasitology Buy book
Edited by: Hany M. Elsheikha and Naveed Ahmed Khan Published: 2011
Book: 978-1-904455-80-6, 978-1-904455-79-0, £199, $319
“excellent, accurate and up to date … an essential tool” (Aus. Vet. J.); “an indispensable acquisition” (Acta Partasitologica); “it is worth buying” (Vet. Para.); “Students will love this book” (VIN) read more …
Full information at Essentials of Veterinary Parasitology.
Anaerobic Parasitic Protozoa: Genomics and Molecular Biology
Anaerobic Parasitic Protozoa: Genomics and Molecular Biology Buy book
Edited by: C. Graham Clark, Patricia J. Johnson and Rodney D. Adam Published: 2010
Book: 978-1-904455-61-5, £199, $319
“very well written and edited … easy to read” (Parasites and Vectors); “highly useful to experts and active researchers” (Quarterly Rev. Biol.); “well written, well referenced and very up to date” (Aus. J. Med. Sci.) read more …
Full information at Anaerobic Parasitic Protozoa.
Acanthamoeba: Biology and Pathogenesis
Acanthamoeba: Biology and Pathogenesis Buy book
Author: Naveed Khan Published: 2009
Book: 978-1-904455-43-1, £199, $319
“a must read for all scientists interested in medical and environmental microbiology” (Parasites and Vectors) read more …
Full information at Acanthamoeba.
Leishmania: After The Genome
Leishmania: After The Genome Buy book
Edited by: Peter J. Myler and Nicolas Fasel Published: 2008
Book: 978-1-904455-28-8, £219, $319
“a mandatory text for PhD students” (Parasites and Vectors); “a valuable overview of the molecular biology and biochemistry” (Microbiology Today); " a most thorough and comprehensive review … a most valuable reference for any scientist … a must for the library" (Aus. J. Med. Sci.) read more …
Full information at Leishmania.
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YOU’RE RIGHT. THERE IS VIRTUALLY NOTHING WRITEN ON PARASITISM. LET ALONE MILLIONS OF PAGES.

ANOTHER UNIVERSITY THAT PROVIDES A LIST OF PARASITES THAT DOES NOT INCLUDE BABIES. AN OVERSIGHT ON THE PART OF THESE DIMWITS, I’M SURE.

CHAPTER ONE Intestinal and Luminal Protozoa
Amebiasis (amebic dysentery, amebic hepatitis), Giardiasis (lambliasis): Epidemiology, morbidity and mortality. Morphology of the organisms. Life cycles, hosts and vectors. Disease, symptoms and pathogenesis. Diagnosis
Prevention and control

CHAPTER TWO Blood Protozoa
Part 1: Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis

Part 2: Malaria

Part 3: Other blood and tissue protozoa

Trypanosomiasis, Leishmaniasis, Malaria, Babesiosis, Toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystsis pneumonia

CHAPTER THREE The Molecular Biology of Trypanosomiasis African and American Trypanosomes. The diseases that they cause. The molecular basis of antigen variation. The mode of action of trypanocidal drugs

CHAPTER FOUR Nematodes Intestinal helminths: Epidemiology, morbidity and mortality. Morphology of the organism. Life cycle, hosts and vectors. Disease, symptoms and pathogenesis. Diagnosis. Prevention and control

CHAPTER FIVE Cestodes The tapeworms: Their epidemiology and life cycles. The diseases that they cause: diagnosis, prevention and control

CHAPTER SIX Trematodes Schistosomiasis (Bilharziasis), Fasciolopsis buski (Giant intestinal fluke), Clonorchis sinensis (Chinese Liver Fluke), Paragonimus westermani (Lung Fluke)

CHAPTER SEVEN PART ONE Arthropods
CHAPTER SEVEN PART TWO Ticks

Source:
University of South Carolina School of Medicine

“According to the very broad definition of parasitology, parasites should include the viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and metazoa (multi-celled organisms) which infect their host species.”

BABIES NOT MENTIONED. ANOTHER OVERSIGHT I’M SURE.

THE BURDEN OF SOME MAJOR PARASITIC INFECTIONS
Plasmodium
Soil transmitted helminths:
• Roundworm (Ascaris)
• Whipworm (Trichuris)

• Hookworm
(Ancylostoma and Necator)
Schistosoma Filariae
Trypanasoma cruzi
African trypanosomes
Leishamania
Diseases
malaria
Pnemonitis, intestinal obstruction
Bloody diarrhoea, rectal prolapse
Coughing, wheezing, abdominal pain and anaemia
Renal tract and intestinal disease
Lymphatic filariasis and elephantiasis
Chagas disease (cardiovascular)
African sleeping sickness
Cutaneous, mucocutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis
No. people infected
273 million 2 billion
Deaths/yr
1.12 million 200,000
The burden of some major parasitic infections
200 million 120 million
13 million
0.3 – 0.5 million
12 million; 2 million new cases/yr
15,000
Not fatal but 40 million disfigured or incapacitated
14,000 48,000 50,000

BABIES NOT MENTIONED. ANOTHER OVERSIGHT BY THE DIMWITS In THE FIELD, I’M SURE. IN SPITE OF THE Fact 140,000,000 BABIES ARE BORN EACH YEAR.

Symbiosis
• Two different organisms live together and interact.

OF COURSE BABIES ARE THE SAME ORGANISM. Parasites according to which site they inhabit

Intestinal and urogenital parasites
(protozoa and/or helminths)

Tissue and blood parasites
(protozoa and/or helminths)

BABIES DO NEITHER. ANOTHER LISTING:

CHAPTER TWOMEDICAL PROTOZOOLOGY13
2.1 Class- Rhizopoda ( Amoebae) 2.1.1Free living amoeba 11
Free living pathogenic amoebae 28
2.2 Class – Zoomastigophora ( Flagellates)32
2.2.1 The Oro-intestinal and Urogenital
2.1.2
flagellates
2.2.2 The Haemo-Somatic Flagellate
3.1.2.2 Liver Flukes 3.2.2.3 Intestinal Flukes 3.2.2.4Lung Flukes
3.2. Nemathelminths
3.3.1. Class Nematoda
131 139
142
145
145 3.3.1.1Intestinalnematodes 145
3.3.1.2. Tissue nematodes 168

STRANGELY, YET AGAIN, NO BABIES MENTIONED. GEEZ THESE GUYS MUST BE STUPID.

Types
There are three main types of parasites.

Protozoa: Examples include the single-celled organism known as Plasmodium. A protozoa can only multiply, or divide, within the host.

Helminths: These are worm parasites. Schistosomiasis is caused by a helminth. Other examples include roundworm, pinworm, trichina spiralis, tapeworm, and fluke.

Ectoparasites: These live on, rather than in their hosts. They include lice and fleas.

EVEN THE DOPES AT MEDICAL NEWS TODAY ARE A BUNCH OF MORONS WHO DON’T RECOGNIZE YOUR GENIUS. I GUESS THATS BECAUSE THERE AREN’T MANY BOOK WRITTEN ON THE TOPIC. GOOD THING YOU ARE THERE TO SET THEM STRAIGHT.

Symptoms

There are many types of parasite, and symptoms can vary widely. Sometimes these may resemble the symptoms of other conditions, such as a hormone deficiency, pneumonia, or food poisoning.

abdominal pain
Some parasite-related problems, such as giardiasis and amebic dysentery, can cause abdominal pain.
Symptoms that might occur include:

skin bumps or rashes
weight loss, increased appetite, or both
abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting
sleeping problems
anemia
aches and pains
allergies
weakness and general feeling unwell
fever
However, parasites can pass on a wide variety of conditions, so symptoms are hard to predict.

Often there are no symptoms, or symptoms appear long after infection, but the parasite can still be transmitted to another person, who may develop symptoms.

SOME HOW THEY OVERLOOKED BABIES BEING BORN. MIGHTY STRANGE THAT, GIVEN THE 140,000,000 BIRTHS CAUSED BY PARASITES EVERY YEAR.

Human parasites
Many types of parasites can affect humans. Here are some examples of parasites and the diseases they can cause.

Acanthamoebiasis

This tiny ameba can affect the eye, the skin, and the brain. It exists all over the world in water and soil. Individuals can become infected if they clean contact lenses with tap water.

Babesiosis

This disease that comes from parasites that are spread by ticks. It affects the red blood cells. The risk is highest in summer in the Northeast and upper Midwest of the United States.

Balantidiasis

This is passed on by Balatidium coli, a single-cell parasite that usually infects pigs but can, in rare cases, cause intestinal infection in humans. It can be spread through direct contact with pigs or by drinking contaminated water, usually in tropical regions.

Blastocystosis

This affects the intestines. The blastocystis enters humans through the fecal-oral route. A person can get it by eating food or drink contaminated with human or animal feces where the parasite is present.

Coccidiosis

This affects the intestines. Coccidia is passed on through the fecal-oral route. It is found around the world. It can also affect dogs and cats, but these are different kinds. Dogs, cats, and humans cannot normally infect each other.

Amoebiasis

This is caused by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica. It affects the intestines. It is more likely in tropical regions and in areas with high population density and poor sanitation. It is transmitted through the fecal-oral route.

Giardiasis

Giardia, or “beaver fever” affects the lumen of the small intestine. If humans ingest food or water contaminated with feces, dormant cysts may infect the body.

Isosporiasis or cystosporiasis

This disease is caused by the Cystoisospora belli, previously known as Isospora belli. It affects the epithelial cells of the small intestine. It exists worldwide and is both treatable and preventable. It is passed on through the fecal-oral route.

Leishmaniasis

This is a disease that is passed on by parasites of the Leishmania family. It can affect the skin, the viscera, or the mucous membranes of the nose, mouth, and throat. It can be fatal. The parasite is transmitted by types of sandflies.

Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM)

This is passed on through a free-living ameba known as Naegleria fowleri. It affects the brain and the nervous system, and it is nearly always fatal within 1 to 18 days. It is transmitted through breathing in contaminated soil, swimming pools, and contaminated water, but not from drinking water.

Malaria

Different types of plasmodium affect the red blood cells. It exists in tropical regions and is transmitted by the Anopheles mosquito.

Rhinosporidiosis

This is caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi. It mainly affects the mucous of the nose, conjunctiva, and urethra. It is more common in India and Sri Lanka but can occur elsewhere. Polyps result in nasal masses that need to be removed through surgery. Bathing in common ponds can expose the nasal mucous to the parasite.

Toxoplasmosis

This is a parasitic pneumonia caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It affects the liver, heart, eyes and brain. It occurs worldwide. People can become infected after ingesting raw or undercooked pork, lamb, goat, or milk, or though contact with food or soil that is contaminated with cat feces.

A person with a healthy immune system will not usually have symptoms, but it can pose a risk during pregnancy and for those with a weakened immune system.

Trichomoniasis

Also known as “trich” this is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. It affects the female urogenital tract. It can exist in males, but usually without symptoms.

Trypanomiasis (Sleeping sickness)

This is passed on when the tetse fly transmits a parasite of the Trypanosoma family. It affects the central nervous system, blood, and lymph. It leads to changes in sleep behavior, among other symptoms, and it is considered fatal without treatment. It can cross the placenta and infect a fetus during pregnancy.

Chagas disease

This affects the blood, muscle, nerves, heart, esophagus and colon. It is transmitted through an insect bite. Over 300,000 people in the U.S. have the parasite that can lead to this disease.

Worms
Worms, or helminth organisms, can affect humans and animals.

Anisakiasis: This is caused by worms that can invade the intestines or the stomach wall. The worms are passed on through contaminated fresh or undercooked fish and squid.

Ascaris roundworms are passed on by raccoons.
Roundworms can be passed on by raccoons.
Roundworm: Ascariasis, or a roundworm infection, does not usually cause symptoms, but the worm may be visible in feces. It enters the body through consuming contaminated food or drink.

Raccoon roundworm: Baylisascaris is passed on through raccoon stools. It can affect the brain, lungs, liver, and intestines. It occurs in North America. People are advised not to keep raccoons as pets for this reason.

Clonorchiasis: Also known as Chinese liver fluke disease, this affects the gall bladder. Humans can become infected after ingesting raw or poorly processed or preserved freshwater fish.

Dioctophyme renalis infection: The giant kidney worm can move through the wall of the stomach to the liver and eventually the kidney. Humans can become infected after eating the eggs of the parasite in raw or undercooked freshwater fish.

Diphyllobothriasis tapeworm: This affects the intestines and blood. Humans can become infected after eating raw fish that live wholly or partly in fresh water. Prevalence has increased in some parts of the developed world, possibly due to the growing popularity of sushi, salted fillets, ceviche, and other raw-fish dishes.

Guinea worm: This affects subcutaneous tissues and muscle and causes blisters and ulcers. The worm may be visible in the blister. As the worms are shed or removed, they enter the soil or water, and are passed on from there.

Hookworms can cause intestinal disease.
Hookworms can cause intestinal disease.
Hookworm: These can cause intestinal disease. They lay their eggs in soil and the larvae can penetrate the skin of humans. Early symptoms include itching and a rash. They are most common in damp places with poor sanitation.

Hymenolepiasis: Humans can become infected by ingesting material contaminated by rodents, cockroaches, mealworms, and flour beetles.

Echinococcosis tapeworm: Cystic echinococcosis can lead to cysts in the liver and lungs, and alveolar echinococcosis can cause a tumor in the liver. Humans can be infected after eating foods contaminated by the feces of an infected animal, or from direct contact with an animal.

Enterobiasis pinworm: A pinworm, or threadworm, Enterobius vermicularis can live in the colon and rectum of humans. The worm lays eggs around the anus while a person sleeps, leading to itching. It spreads through the oral-fecal route.

Fasciolosis liver fluke: This affects the gall bladder and liver. It is common in countries where cattle or sheep are reared, but rare in the U.S. It can affect the liver and the bile ducts and it causes gastrointestinal symptoms. It passes from one mammal to another through snails. A person may get it from eating watercress, for example.

Fasciolopsiasis intestinal fluke: This affects the intestines. It can also transmitted when consuming contaminated water plants or water.

Gnathostomiasis: This causes swellings under the skin, and occasionally affects the liver, the eyes, and the nervous system. It is rare, but it can be fatal. It occurs in Southeast Asia. It is transmitted by eating freshwater fish, pigs, snails, frogs, and chicken.

Loa loa filariasis: Also known as loaisis, this is caused by the Loa loa worm, or African eye worm. It causes itchy swellings on the body. It occurs mainly in Central and West Africa and is transmitted through deerfly bites.

Mansonellosis: This is passed on through the bites of midges or blackflies. It affects the layers under the surface of the skin, but it can enter the blood. It can lead to angioedema, swellings, skin rash, fever, and joint problems. It is present in Africa and Cental America.

River blindness: Caused by a worm known as Onchocerca volvulus, this affects the eyes, skin, and other body tissues. It is found near fast flowing water. It is transmitted through the bite of a blackfly. It occurs in South America, but 90 percent of cases are in Africa.

Lung fluke: Also known as paragonimiasis, this affects the lungs, causing symptoms similar to those of tuberculosis (TB). However, it can reach the central nervous system, leading to meningitis. It is transmitted when eating undercooked or raw freshwater crabs, crayfishes, and other crustaceans. It is most common in parts of Asia.

Schistosomiasis, bilharzia, or snail fever: There are different types of schistosomiasis. They can affect the skin and internal organs. It results from exposure to fresh water that has snails in it that are infected with the blood fluke, or trematode worm. The worms are not found in the U.S. but they are common worldwide.

Sparganosis: Humans can become infected if they eat foods tainted with dog or cat feces that contains the larvae of a tapeworm of the Spirometra family. It can lead to a migrating abscess under the skin. It is rare.

Strongyloidiasis: This can lead to severe and possibly fatal immunodeficiency. The parasite penetrates through the skin and affects the lungs, skin, and intestines. It is passed on through direct contact with contaminated soil. It most occurs in tropical and subtropical regions.

Tapeworm
Different types of tapeworm can affect the intestines, the liver, or the lungs.
Beef and pork tapeworms: Taeniasis is caused by tapeworms of the taenia family. They affect the intestines. They are passed on by eating undercooked beef or pork.

Toxocariasis: A roundworm transmits this infection from animals to humans. It affects the eyes, brain, and liver. It is caused by accidentally swallowing the eggs of the parasite, for example, when young children play with soil. Nearly 14 percent of people in the U.S. have antibodies, suggesting that millions have been exposed. Most never have symptoms.

Trichinosis: This is caused by the roundworm of the Trichinella family. Infection can lead to intestinal symptoms, fever, and muscle aches. It is passed on by eating undercooked meat.

Whipworm: Also known as trichuriasis, whipworms live in the large intestine. Eggs are passed in feces. It is common all over the world. Humans can become infected when ingesting the eggs, for example on unwashed fruit or vegetables.

Elephantiasis lymphatic filariasis: This is transmitted through mosquito bites. The adult worms live in the lymph system. Infection can lead to lyphedema and elephantiasis, in which swelling can cause disfigurement and disability. In the Americas, it is passed on by the Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito.

Ringworm is sometimes mistaken for a worm, but it is not a worm. It is a fungal infection.

Ectoparasites
These are parasites that live on the outside of the body, such as fleas.

bed bug
Bed bugs are ectoparasites: They live on the outside of the body.
Bedbug: These can affect the skin and vision. They are found all over the world. Sharing clothing and bedding can spread infection. They may be present in newly rented accommodation and hotel rooms.

Body lice: These are common worldwide. Infection can spread through sexual activity, skin-to-skin contact, and sharing bedding or clothing.

Crab lice: These affect the pubic area and eyelashes. They are common all over the world and spread through sexual activity, skin-to-skin contact, and sharing bedding or clothing.

Demodex: These affect the eyebrow and eyelashes. They are common all over the world and can spread through prolonged skin contact.

Scabies: This affects the skin. It is common all over the world and can spread through sexual activity, skin-to-skin contact, and sharing bedding or clothing.

Screwworm: This is transmitted by a fly, and it affects skin and wounds. It is found in Central America and North Africa.

Head lice: These live on the scalp and affect the hair follicles. They are common all over the world and spread through head-to-head contact. A reaction to their saliva causes itching.

WHAT IS WITH THESE JACKASSES? WHY DO THEY REFUSE TO INCLUDE THE OBVIOUS CLASS OF PARASITES KNOW AS BABIES? MUST BE RUSSIAN COLLUSION!

Prevention
To increase your chance of avoiding parasites:

find out which kind are prevalent in your area or in locations you may travel
take precautions, for example, using insect repellant in places where mosquitoes are common
be careful to eat only well-cooked fish and meat
when traveling, drink only water from bottles with a sealed top
take care when bathing in fresh-water lakes or rivers.

WHO KNEW YOU COULD CATCH A BABY FORM DRINKING WATER OR INSECT BITES?

CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL LIST OF HUMAN PARASITES. IF ANYONE KNOWS THERE PARASITES IT SHOULD BE THESE GUYS. OF COURSE THIS IS ONLY AN INCOMPLETE LIST SO YOU CAN’T RULE OUT BABIES AS PARASITES. IF ONLY THEY HAD YOURINDEPENDENT THOUGHT” TO HELP THEM SEE THE LIGHT.

Acanthamoeba Infection

Acanthamoeba Keratitis Infection

African Sleeping Sickness (African trypanosomiasis)

Alveolar Echinococcosis (Echinococcosis, Hydatid Disease)

Amebiasis (Entamoeba histolytica Infection)

American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease)

Ancylostomiasis (Hookworm)

Angiostrongyliasis (Angiostrongylus Infection)

Anisakiasis (Anisakis Infection, Pseudoterranova Infection)

Ascariasis (Ascaris Infection, Intestinal Roundworms)

Babesiosis (Babesia Infection)

Balantidiasis (Balantidium Infection)

Balamuthia

Baylisascariasis (Baylisascaris Infection, Raccoon Roundworm)

Bed Bugs

Bilharzia (Schistosomiasis)

Blastocystis hominis Infection

Body Lice Infestation (Pediculosis)

Capillariasis (Capillaria Infection)

Cercarial Dermatitis (Swimmer’s Itch)

Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis)

Chilomastix mesnili Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa)

Clonorchiasis (Clonorchis Infection)

CLM (Cutaneous Larva Migrans, Ancylostomiasis, Hookworm)

“Crabs” (Pubic Lice)

Cryptosporidiosis (Cryptosporidium Infection)

Cutaneous Larva Migrans (CLM, Ancylostomiasis, Hookworm)

Cyclosporiasis (Cyclospora Infection)

Cysticercosis (Neurocysticercosis)

Cystoisospora Infection (Cystoisosporiasis) formerly Isospora Infection
Dientamoeba fragilis Infection

Diphyllobothriasis (Diphyllobothrium Infection)

Dipylidium caninum

Infection (dog or cat tapeworm infection)

Dirofilariasis (Dirofilaria Infection)

DPDx

Dracunculiasis (Guinea Worm Disease)

Drinking Water

Dog tapeworm(Dipylidium caninum Infection)

Echinococcosis (Cystic, Alveolar Hydatid Disease)

Elephantiasis (Filariasis, Lymphatic Filariasis)

Endolimax nana Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa)

Entamoeba coli Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa)

Entamoeba dispar Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa)

Entamoeba hartmanni

Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa)

Entamoeba histolytica

Infection (Amebiasis)

Entamoeba polecki

Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection)

Fascioliasis (Fasciola Infection)

Fasciolopsiasis (Fasciolopsis Infection)

Filariasis (Lymphatic Filariasis, Elephantiasis)

Foodborne Diseases

Giardiasis (Giardia Infection)

Gnathostomiasis (Gnathostoma Infection)

Guinea Worm Disease (Dracunculiasis)

Head Lice Infestation (Pediculosis)

Heterophyiasis (Heterophyes Infection)

Hookworm Infection, Human

Hookworm Infection, Zoonotic (Ancylostomiasis, Cutaneous Larva Migrans [CLM])

Hydatid Disease (Cystic, Alveolar Echinococcosis)

Hymenolepiasis (Hymenolepis Infection)

Intestinal Roundworms (Ascariasis, Ascaris Infection)

Iodamoeba buetschlii

Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa)

Isospora Infection (see Cystoisospora
Infection)

Kala-azar (Leishmaniasis, Leishmania Infection)

Keratitis (Acanthamoeba Infection)

Leishmaniasis (Kala-azar, Leishmania Infection)

Lice Infestation (Body, Head, or Pubic Lice, Pediculosis, Pthiriasis)

Liver Flukes (Clonorchiasis, Opisthorchiasis, Fascioliasis)

Loiasis (Loa loa Infection)

Lymphatic filariasis (Filariasis, Elephantiasis)

Malaria (Plasmodium Infection)

Microsporidiosis (Microsporidia Infection )

Mite Infestation (Scabies)

Myiasis

Naegleria Infection

Neurocysticercosis (Cysticercosis)

Neglected Parasitic Infections in the U.S.

Neglected Tropical Diseases

Nonpathogenic (Harmless) Intestinal Protozoa

Ocular Larva Migrans (Toxocariasis, Toxocara Infection, Visceral Larva Migrans)

Onchocerciasis (River Blindness)

Opisthorchiasis (Opisthorchis Infection)

Paragonimiasis (Paragonimus Infection)

Pediculosis (Head or Body Lice Infestation)

Pthiriasis (Pubic Lice Infestation)

Pinworm Infection (Enterobiasis)

Plasmodium Infection (Malaria)

Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia

PREGNANCY????

Pseudoterranova Infection (Anisakiasis, Anisakis Infection)

Pubic Lice Infestation (“Crabs,” Pthiriasis)

Raccoon Roundworm Infection (Baylisascariasis, Baylisascaris Infection)

Recreational Water

River Blindness (Onchocerciasis)

Sappinia

Sarcocystosis (Sarcocystosis Infection)

Scabies

Schistosomiasis (Bilharzia)

Sleeping Sickness (Trypanosomiasis, African; African Sleeping Sickness)

Soil-transmitted Helminths

Strongyloidiasis (Strongyloides Infection)

Swimmer’s Itch (Cercarial Dermatitis)

Swimming Pools

Taeniasis (Taenia Infection, Tapeworm Infection)

Tapeworm Infection (Taeniasis, Taenia Infection)

Toxocariasis (Toxocara Infection, Ocular Larva Migrans, Visceral Larva Migrans)

Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma Infection)

Trichinellosis (Trichinosis)

Trichinosis (Trichinellosis)

Trichomoniasis (Trichomonas Infection)

Trichuriasis (Whipworm Infection, Trichuris Infection)

Trypanosomiasis, African (African Sleeping Sickness, Sleeping Sickness)

Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease)

Visceral Larva Migrans (Toxocariasis, Toxocara Infection, Ocular Larva Migrans)

Waterborne Diseases

Whipworm Infection (Trichuriasis, Trichuris Infection)

Zoonotic Diseases(https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/animals.html) (Diseases spread from animals to people)

Zoonotic Hookworm Infection(https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/zoonotichookworm/index.html) (Ancylostomiasis, Cutaneous Larva Migrans [CLM])

WHY THE HELL THESE IDIOTS DON’T UNDERSTAND THAT BABIES ARE PARASITES IS BEYOND ME. WHAT A BUNCH OF DOPES. WHAT A BUNCH OF UNEDUCATED HICKS. OR PERHAPS THE LIST IN NOT COMPLETE ENOUGH FOR THE INCONSEQUENTIAL NUMBER OF 140,000,000 BABIES BORN EACH YEAR. MAYBE IT WAS JUST AN OVERSIGHT.

GOOD THING ANDREW IS HERE TO GIVE THEM THE EDUCATION THAT ALL THOSE MED SCHOOL YEARS AND RESEARCH DEPRIVED THEM OF. WE’LL ALL SLEEP BETTER KNOWING THAT ANDREW’S “INDEPENDENT THOUGHT” IS RIDING TO THE RESCUE TO INFORM ALL OF THESE DUMBASSES OF THE FACTS.
commented 2019-08-08 01:03:13 -0400
What a joke. You state that the list I provided- that is pages long- is not complete enough to establish that humans babies are not parasites. Now you find two excerpts online that are incomplete and one of which uses the parasite as an analogy not a literal parasite. That’s the best you can do?

I think I have show more evidence than you have by a long shot. But at least you are now making an attempt. But you have found no medical body that supports your view, as in say, textbook form that is taught in med school. You have found tangential connections that hardly support your view. You are still desperately seeking comforting lies.

And if not, why not?
-—————————
Because parasites remain parasites throughout their life cycle. They change form sometimes but they never become anything other than a parasite. By your reasoning then all babies remain parasites at all stages and we should kill them all off at any age. In other words we would destroy the human race. Parasites do not become a different species. Neither do babies.

We’ve covered this before but you conveniently ignore it. Why? Because you want to believe and promulgate lies. Why you do is a mystery.
commented 2019-08-07 01:34:37 -0400
“But there is a hundred years of previous scientific evidence and conclusions and millions of pages written on the topic. You simply want to avoid them since you know they do not support your position.”

Millions, hmm? No, this is not something that is well studied at all. In fact there’s very little on Pubmed. You;‘re trying to appeal to a burden of wisdom that simply doesn’t exist.

A few studies do exist, and they mostly seem to consider a parasitic model as useful.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28712140
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society/article/foetus-as-a-parasite/FE3C75CA91EF14B39FE4419B107241E5

Paywalled, I think – a lot of literature still is as open-access is pricey- but there’s enough information in the abstracts or previews to highlight my point.

Having established that the literature has at least flirted with the idea, Is my own deduction valid, or isn’t it? And, if not, why not?
commented 2019-08-06 22:05:04 -0400
ANDREW STEPHENSON

If an argument is logically valid, and its input conditions are defensible, should such an argument not stand on its own merit?
-————-
No. It also has to cohere with previous knowledge unless it disproves it. That is what peer review is for. Present it to your “peers”.

Scientists are trained to seek the novel and a huge part of our job is ensuring we do so in a defensible manner;


Then why don’t you defend it before your “peers”?

peer re·view (pēr rē-vyū’),
Process of evaluating research proposals, manuscripts submitted for publication, and abstracts submitted for presentation at a scientific meeting, whereby these are JUDGED FOR TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC MERIT BY OTHER SCIENTISTS IN THE SAME FIELD.

https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/peer+review

…since it’s new, there is no precedent to refer to.
-——————-
But there is a hundred years of previous scientific evidence and conclusions and millions of pages written on the topic. You simply want to avoid them since you know they do not support your position. To use the common vernacular, you are chicken. You know you are believing and promulgating lies so you won’t take the opportunity to amaze the world with your brilliant insights that will stand the scientific and medical world on its’ head.

The reality:

1. You won’t look at evidence that contradicts your position. No peer review by you.

2. You will not present your “ideas” for peer review. No peer review for you.

Ergo, you have no leg to stand on. You are a charlatan. Anyone who is this specious in their argument in this field is of questionable credibility in all fields.
commented 2019-08-06 21:35:26 -0400 · Flag
My question to you, Duke, is pretty simple, and follows.

I argue that the external validation is unnecessary. If an argument is logically valid, and its input conditions are defensible, should such an argument not stand on its own merit? Scientists are trained to seek the novel and a huge part of our job is ensuring we do so in a defensible manner; since it’s new, there is no precedent to refer to.

You disagree with my conclusion. If my conclusion is wrong, some element of my deduction must be wrong, or one of my input conditions is wrong. Where did my error occur?
commented 2019-08-06 21:23:47 -0400
“I have refuted you numerous times on numerous points. But that is a waste of time when all YOU have to do is…… "

You’ve established you can find a list that omits it, although as I pointed out, these lists omitted other examples as well. Do you feel it’s reasonable to use that as evidence? Put another way, if I listed odd numbers as 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, etc, would it be valid to claim 11 was not odd because I didn’t list it? You have yet to provide positive confirmation as part of your rebuttal (unless I missed it, which is possible. If that’s the case, could you re-provide the link?)

“You know there are none who agree with you so you want to waste time arguing what has no scientific merit.

I don’t think anyone’s asked them. Perhaps they don’t speak of it because they didn’t think of it in that way). .