February 01, 2019

Trudeau Liberals waste $4M on electric cars and charging stations in Ottawa area

Keean BexteRebel Contributor

Talk is cheap, unless you’re the government. How much do you think virtue signaling could cost taxpayers? Well, when it comes to electric vehicles, if you aren’t thinking in the seven-figure range you aren’t thinking big enough.

In a report given to The Rebel, we can see a breakdown of every electric vehicle and charging station that was purchased or installed by the federal in the Ottawa area. We have a breakdown of every government department, and I think that the results are going to surprise you.

I didn’t believe it when I saw the numbers, but the government of Canada could have bought the same number of Maseratis for cheaper than their entire fleet of electric vehicles.

Stacking up all of the government portfolios, the Ministry of Innovation, Science and Economic Development (headed by Navdeep Bains) is on top in terms of electric car ownership. It has seven on its own.

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna’s Ministry only has two. Frankly, I don’t think McKenna is taking the urgent threat of global warming seriously. Doesn’t she know the world going to end in like twelve years if we are all not driving Prius’?

A total of forty-one cars (not including the emissions testers) lands the government a cool bill of $1.23 million. I get it though, the government needs cars, and cars are expensive.

Where this gets unreasonable is the charging stations.

The Department of Public Services and Procurement Canada took the hit for almost all of the other departments, and the bill to install their network of plug-ins around Ottawa (for forty-one cars) rings in at $2.8 million!

What is so peculiar about the cost of the stations is the huge variation in the price of a plug-in. On November 30, 2017, they installed 10 stations for $100,000 but on January 23 they spent $230,000 on only two chargers.

Who is making these deals? What a terrible deal for taxpayers!

Comments
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commented 2019-02-05 00:53:49 -0500
Peter Netterville commented 1 day ago
Andrew you never addressed my comment,

Renewable energy is not at the point where it is viable:

Electric vehicles are not viable in small town areas or rural."\

Renewables are largely held back by the ponderous nature of our mostly public electricity system. More than quarter of Iowa’s generation was from wind, and even Texas generated 15%.

Most Canadians do not live in small towns or rural areas.

“Al Peterson commented 1 day ago
From the New York Times:
For many people reading this, air travel is their most serious environmental sin. One round-trip flight from New York to Europe or to San Francisco creates a warming effect equivalent to 2 or 3 tons of carbon dioxide per person. The average American generates about 19 tons of carbon dioxide a year; the average European, 10. "

If you’re taking the trip anyway, flying is better than driving. If you’re crossing an ocean, then you have little choice.

Both major airlines fly from Regina to Winnipeg, maybe 2.5x further than Brandon, suggesting it’s a viable route. I’ve flown that route myself and the loads seem decent.

Your A320 might burn 2 tonnes in climbout, but in a short haul that’s most of the fuel being consumed since there’s little cruise in short-haul and they idle through descent.
commented 2019-02-04 13:00:01 -0500
I would like to know who the “connected” car salesperson is, that sold their buds some overpriced virtue signaling vehicles.
commented 2019-02-03 23:59:22 -0500
Also the short run flights are the most environmentally unfriendly since the climb burns far more fuel than at cruise. An A320 will burn somewhere in the neighbourhood of 2 tonnes of fuel in climb. I could drive 23,000 miles or 38,000 km on that much fuel.
commented 2019-02-03 23:49:12 -0500
ANDREW STEPHENSON
How many people does that limitation actually affect? I really don’t know a lot of people that regularly drive that far. I fly the instant it becomes faster to do so, which is close enough to be in Tesla range.
_______________________________________________________________________________

Where would you fly 200-300 km? From any city in Canada that pretty much puts you out in the bush or on the prairie somewhere.

If I want to go to Brandon I can jump in my car and be there in 3 hours. If I am going to Green-Weenie it I will still have to drive an hour to Winnipeg airport and arrive an hour early so there is 2 hours shot before I even get into the air. Then I wait to go through security and board the plane and wait for take off clearance so it is probably 3 hours before the wheels leave the ground.

A flight to Brandon will only take a few minutes since it is only 275 Km but well within the distance you say we should fly and not drive and, in fact, that “most people” do fly. But , according to Flight Hub, that flight will cost me $463 one way. Driving will cost me less than $25.

I can assure you that very few people fly from Winnipeg to Brandon. I don’t know anyone who does.

Thanks for the advice but I will continue to drive.
commented 2019-02-03 23:25:23 -0500
From the New York Times:
For many people reading this, air travel is their most serious environmental sin. One round-trip flight from New York to Europe or to San Francisco creates a warming effect equivalent to 2 or 3 tons of carbon dioxide per person. The average American generates about 19 tons of carbon dioxide a year; the average European, 10.

So if you take five long flights a year, they may well account for three-quarters of the emissions you create. “For many people in New York City, who don’t drive much and live in apartments, this is probably going to be by far the largest part of their carbon footprint,” says Anja Kollmuss, a Zurich-based environmental consultant.

And you still have to drive a car when you get to your destination.
commented 2019-02-03 15:47:47 -0500
Andrew you never addressed my comment,
“Also, did you notice that your averaged stats for Canada still only placed renewables at 5%?
How many billions has been invested in renewable energy sources for just 5%? And that 5% is unreliable. No sun no energy from solar panel farms. No wind no energy from wind turbine farms.”

Renewable energy is not at the point where it is viable: not a steady source, not reliable, not enough power for the volume of equipment necessary, no stored power for when the sources are not producing, not economically viable (i.e. too much cost of investment for the returned value).

Electric vehicles are not viable in small town areas or rural.
commented 2019-02-03 15:32:36 -0500
“You obviously live isolated in a city. All rural and small town (less that 200,000) electric cars are useless crap.

And even in the city when you plug in your vehicle at home it takes about 30 hours to charge from full discharge. So, if you only use about 1/5 of the charge during the day, then you can charge it up over night"

Like most Canadians I do indeed live in the city.

I agree that it’s ponderous from e.g. a block heater plug, but you’re rarely charging it from stone dead. That’s also why they’re installing fast-chargers which can charge a government fleet vehicle over lunch.

“That is averaged over the country, Ontario providing most of that stat. Most other provinces it is mostly coal & natural gas. For instance, there is no nuclear in Alberta at all and hydroelectric is about 7%, so natural gas and coal is the mainstay. "

BC, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and Newfoundland all derive the vast majority of their power from non-emitting sources, and represent close to 80% of Canadians. Alberta is exceptionally dependent on fossil fuels (they found it cheaper to build thermal plants in the south rather than build hydro plants in the North), Sask and NS slightly less so, New Brunswick’s about 50-50.
commented 2019-02-03 15:19:39 -0500
Al Peterson commented 15 hours ago
“Almost everyone Know drives distances like that fairly regularly. Out here in Manitoba my wife’s cousin drove 2 hours in and out of Winnipeg downtown everyday for 30 years. We aren’t all turbo-weenies.

And you fly?!!!! That is the most carbon intensive means of transportation there is. Kind of negates the benefits of several thousand electric cars. Nothing like a virtue signalling leftie to provide a laugh for the day. Thanks for that one. "

When I lived in Winnipeg I almost never went beyond the Perimeter, and almost everyone I knew was the same. Don’t overinterpret what is probably an artifact of sample bias – what are the actual usage patterns? Again I’d argue that a huge chunk of the fleet is almost entirely used for commuting rather than long distance travel, especially in geographically compact markets like southern Ontario – which also represents far more of the Canadian market than the rural prairies.

Flying is more fuel-efficient than driving alone, or even with two people even 20 year old planes get 60mpg/seat, while a modern jet on a mid-range flight such as that YYC-YWG flight is about 80mpg for a seat… some very new aircraft push 100. It’s literally a quarter the time which is not something without value itself. If you have to travel, it’s the least-evil way to do it.
commented 2019-02-03 14:33:00 -0500
the trouble with voting bernier in the next election is that he will suck votes away from the liberal light party, (the PC’s), and Trudeau will still win cause of it,——- Vote PC’s. You know it and I know it and Trudeau knows it.
commented 2019-02-03 09:03:04 -0500
Al Peterson said, "And you fly?!!!! That is the most carbon intensive means of transportation there is. Kind of negates the benefits of several thousand electric cars. Nothing like a virtue signalling leftie to provide a laugh for the day. Thanks for that one. "

Good one! I missed that.
commented 2019-02-03 09:01:32 -0500
Andrew Stephenson said, “How many people does that limitation actually affect? I really don’t know a lot of people that regularly drive that far.”

You obviously live isolated in a city. All rural and small town (less that 200,000) electric cars are useless crap.

And even in the city when you plug in your vehicle at home it takes about 30 hours to charge from full discharge. So, if you only use about 1/5 of the charge during the day, then you can charge it up over night.

Andrew continued to say, “Most Canadian electricity is generated from non-fossil sources – according to NRC, 60% hydro, 16% nuclear, 5% other renewables, and the rest (about a fifth) is fossil fuels.”

That is averaged over the country, Ontario providing most of that stat. Most other provinces it is mostly coal & natural gas. For instance, there is no nuclear in Alberta at all and hydroelectric is about 7%, so natural gas and coal is the mainstay.

Also, did you notice that your averaged stats for Canada still only placed renewables at 5%?

How many billions has been invested in renewable energy sources for just 5%? And that 5% is unreliable. No sun no energy from solar panel farms. No wind no energy from wind turbine farms.

Renewable energy is not ready for prime time. When it is, I will be among the first to jump on the band wagon, but until then, it is a massive waste of time, land, resources and money!
commented 2019-02-03 08:50:27 -0500
My hope is that all the trolls and liberals rush out and buy electric cars during our long Canadian winters and than they can be just like their hero JT . They could lead by example and show us simple folk how intelligent they are !
commented 2019-02-03 07:31:14 -0500
-39 today and drifted snow , I hope electric vehicles have 4×4 and good heaters . Actually they would be a great tool in getting rid of stupid people !
commented 2019-02-03 00:33:33 -0500
Range of electric cars: about 100 miles. Some as much as 300.
https://www.motor1.com/features/228379/longest-range-evs/

‘But how long will an EV will have to be plugged into the wall before it’s ready for its next silent neighbourhood mission? The quick answer to that question is overnight. Most EVs that will be on the market within the next few years will need to be plugged in overnight to fully charge.’
https://auto.howstuffworks.com/how-long-does-it-take-to-charge-an-electric-car.htm

I drive Winnipeg to Calgary several times a year. It takes me about 15 hours. Distance 1327 Km or 824 miles.

An electric car will make 8 stops to charge. Far more in the winter. Then it will take 8 hrs to recharge each time. So basically one 100 mile trip per day. So it will take me somewhere in the vicinity of 192 hrs to drive an electric car the same distance.

No thanks.
commented 2019-02-03 00:05:46 -0500
Not Turbo-weenies. Urbo-weenies!
commented 2019-02-03 00:05:05 -0500
I have never driven an electric car but I am pretty sure that they can provide no heat for a Canadian winter drive. Using the batteries to heat would suck the range down to 5 miles, I would guess.
commented 2019-02-03 00:03:06 -0500
“How many people on a trip want to wait for 30 minutes before they can continue on their way for another 200 to 300 KM. And better hope there is another charging station when you run out of charge. "

How many people does that limitation actually affect? I really don’t know a lot of people that regularly drive that far. I fly the instant it becomes faster to do so, which is close enough to be in Tesla range.
________________________________________________________________________________
Almost everyone Know drives distances like that fairly regularly. Out here in Manitoba my wife’s cousin drove 2 hours in and out of Winnipeg downtown everyday for 30 years. We aren’t all turbo-weenies.

And you fly?!!!! That is the most carbon intensive means of transportation there is. Kind of negates the benefits of several thousand electric cars. Nothing like a virtue signalling leftie to provide a laugh for the day. Thanks for that one.
commented 2019-02-03 00:03:06 -0500
“How many people on a trip want to wait for 30 minutes before they can continue on their way for another 200 to 300 KM. And better hope there is another charging station when you run out of charge. "

How many people does that limitation actually affect? I really don’t know a lot of people that regularly drive that far. I fly the instant it becomes faster to do so, which is close enough to be in Tesla range.
________________________________________________________________________________
Almost everyone Know drives distances like that fairly regularly. Out here in Manitoba my wife’s cousin drove 2 hours in and out of Winnipeg downtown everyday for 30 years. We aren’t all turbo-weenies.

And you fly?!!!! That is the most carbon intensive means of transportation there is. Kind of negates the benefits of several thousand electric cars. Nothing like a virtue signalling leftie to provide a laugh for the day. Thanks for that one.
commented 2019-02-02 22:37:23 -0500
They installed a charging station at one of the local Tim Hortons. It resembles the monolith from 2001 – A Space Odyssey and just sits there waiting for some monkeys to come around and get enlightened.
It is innovative though. Just like the Ford Edsel was innovative.
commented 2019-02-02 20:25:17 -0500
“Alberta Maga commented 1 day ago
Andrew Stephenson what loads? They are not exactly highly used. "

The peak draw, which is what the infrastructure has to be sized for (amps) is the same whether it’s in constant use or used once a month.

“How many people on a trip want to wait for 30 minutes before they can continue on their way for another 200 to 300 KM. And better hope there is another charging station when you run out of charge. "

How many people does that limitation actually affect? I really don’t know a lot of people that regularly drive that far. I fly the instant it becomes faster to do so, which is close enough to be in Tesla range. Many households own multiple vehicles, and one could still achieve substantial electrification by simply using the one gas vehicle when needed. Or rent one.

Most Canadian electricity is generated from non-fossil sources – according to NRC, 60% hydro, 16% nuclear, 5% other renewables, and the rest (about a fifth) is fossil fuels. Ontario could charge a couple million cars with just the current night time glut, which would probably benefit everyone; it would provide an alternative to dumping it below-cost, something that costs billions of dollars a year.
commented 2019-02-02 14:35:33 -0500
Problems with electric cars, aside the fact that the electricity is generated by fossil fuels, is the charge time and charging stations.

Five minutes to fuel a vehicle with gas or diesel, thirty minutes minimum to rapid charge and electric vehicle.

How many people on a trip want to wait for 30 minutes before they can continue on their way for another 200 to 300 KM. And better hope there is another charging station when you run out of charge.

Some day the technology will exist, but not today, not for a long time yet.
commented 2019-02-02 14:16:32 -0500
Keean , it would be interesting to know the usage of the charging stations in Fort Macleod, if they’re even still there. I’ll have to do some digging and make a trip there.
commented 2019-02-02 13:28:20 -0500
Well I guess Trudeau dose not need electric cars, let’s all crowd fund to give him one of those electric chairs, you know the kind I mean, where the sitter has to be strapped in.
commented 2019-02-01 20:01:06 -0500
How well are those Electric Cars working in 30 Below temperatures? The last Prius I saw had a Gasoline heater.
commented 2019-02-01 19:06:42 -0500
The $$$reward to the contractor has nothing to do with the actual cost to install the charging stations.
It is directly commensurate with the $$ generosity of donations to the Liberal Party.
Elections have consequences.
commented 2019-02-01 18:49:01 -0500
Okay so Occasional Cortex says the world is going to end in 12 years because Catastrophic Man Made Global warming while the rest of the Dems say global warming is an existential threat. So why do the Dems want to buy a billion dollar ice breaker???
https://www.breitbart.com/border/2019/02/01/democrats-proposal-for-us-mexico-border-talks-includes-billion-dollar-polar-icebreaker/
Kinda makes our climate alarmists look small time.
🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️
commented 2019-02-01 17:36:11 -0500
you want to buy them. pay your hydro bill trudy.
commented 2019-02-01 17:33:41 -0500
Someone should make sure they are real. Remember Sheila discovered that the ones at the climate change conference were fake.
commented 2019-02-01 17:18:17 -0500
Typical liberals , wasting taxpayers money and wasting oxygen !