February 25, 2018

Trump's “listening session” after Parkland shooting “showed his softer side”

Amanda HeadRebel Contributor

On Wednesday, President Trump held a listening session at the White House with students, parents and teachers on the topic of school shootings.

The President listened intently as visitors in the room expressed emotions ranging from sorrow and anger to gratitude that they were not personally affected by a mass shooting tragedy.

At one point, Trump asked for a show of hands in support of having either armed guards or faculty members present at schools.

A number of attendees raised their hands in favor. He then asked who opposed the idea. When a few people hesitantly raised their hands, he assured them that they were safe in expressing their views and that it was perfectly fine to feel that way.

It showed a softer side of our president that most Americans appreciate seeing and is an even better indicator of the kind of man he is.

I've also seen an idea floating around the Internet that teachers should be able to submit students names to a list if they observe them exhibiting alarming behavior, aggression, anger issues, or other problems deeming that child as a potential threat.

I cannot state emphatically enough how dangerous this idea is.

We already know how much liberal bias exists in the education system. Do we really want to give educators the ability to put students on a registry that could potentially impede their rights at that time and in the future?

This is a very dangerous prospect and is a little too Big Brother for me.

But here are some of the ideas that visitors to the White House suggested:

* Check points at entrances to schools (metal detectors, canine units)
* Better physical security/barricades/locked entrances and exits
* Armed guards
* FCC for faculty/staff

While everyone in the roomed seemed to appreciate the time that President Trump, Vice President Pence and Education Secretary DeVos spent with them, some criticized the meeting.

A Twitter user known as Toure (whose account is verified as a podcaster) said in a tweet:

"This White House-Parkland listening session feels like a profile in cowardice: where are the Parkland students who have been so public and strong? David Hogg? Emma Gonzales? Is the White House afraid of powerful teenagers?"

It should be noted that among those in attendance was the father of Meadow Pollack along with his sons, and a mom who lost her daughter in the Columbine massacre.

That's who he's calling "cowards."

But the people Toure cited in the tweet were perhaps too busy taking smiley pictures with news media personalities, despite the fact that they just lost 17 of their classmates.

Toure seems to associate loud voices with courage and quiet, measured voices with cowardice.

They weren't the loudest voices who attended President Trump's meeting. They were the most measured and logical voices.

These people showed up because they wanted to elevate solutions, not their voices (unlike many of the teens the mainstream media focused on during the last few days.)

President Trump is fully committed to finding a solution that does not infringe on our freedoms and rights as Americans.

And I have full faith that being the problem solver and deal maker that he is, we will accomplish that.

 

 

 

Comments
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commented 2018-02-25 20:57:04 -0500
Andrew when will the left realize the danger for Aboriginal women comes from Aboriginal men being mollycoddled? Try actually getting tough on real criminals before you deny others defense.
commented 2018-02-25 20:55:26 -0500
Dictators and commies take your guns away, they want to control you PLAIN AND SIMPLE!
commented 2018-02-25 20:53:55 -0500
Andrew US has fewer than many other countries with gun control , how about you explain that first. And Canada has many rifles that you want to have banned. Tel me why there are not more shootings in Canada more like it. Everyone i know who owns guns has never shot anyone.
commented 2018-02-25 20:51:19 -0500
Andrew please tell me why a cute sidearm is at a disadvantage in a school? How about you get an ar-15 and i will get a nice handgun and meet me in an empty school with rubber rounds, see who wins.
commented 2018-02-25 20:49:46 -0500
Andrew gun control failed in Florida , what part of that don’t you get? Get back to us when you keep them from criminals hands, until then others need them. Who the hell are you to decide for me or anyone else?
commented 2018-02-25 19:41:06 -0500
In point of fact Andrew the laws in place in Florida were more than adequate to protect the students. The fault did not lie in the number of firearms available, the fault lay in the failure of law enforcement in failing to act on the multiple complaints filed against the shooter.
commented 2018-02-25 18:31:51 -0500
“Robert Mcclelland commented 2018-02-25 17:42:04 -0500
Actually Andrew, there are an estimated 15 million AR15s in the U.S., are you really going to be able to control all of them?”

If they had controlled the one the Florida shooter bought, this wouldn’t have happened. There should never have been 15 million AR15s out there. Maybe a few in very specific circumstances, not in widespread circulation. Most illegal weapons are legal ones that were stolen, reduce the latter and you reduce the former.

“Andy Neimers commented 2018-02-25 17:44:47 -0500
Once again Ms. Stephenson you are are blowing pixie dust in the air hoping nobody will notice: – “Whatever cute sidearm the teacher has down his pants doesn’t stand a chance.”…. Yeah, but suppose, more realistically, that the teacher doesn’t have a “cute sidearm” down his pants but keeps a .357 Magnum revolver locked in his desk?… Have you every shot a .357?… Do you have any idea of the firepower?… Didn’t think so… "

Depends if he can get to his desk, and unlock it, aim, and fire, before the shooter has already put 30 bullets in him. Even law enforcement with years of training doesn’t engage when outgunned. Or is he carrying it around with him all the time? Does that seem wise around a bunch of school age children? This is a country that thinks teaching 14 year olds about birth control is stealing their innocence, yet it’s just fine to have teachers walking around, ready to shoot to kill at the slightest provocation? What a country.

I suppose, if you follow the NRA’s guidelines for “hardening” schools (brick over the windows, cut down all the trees, ubiquitous surveillance, armed guards, security fencing around perimeter), you’ll get them used to prison young. Which is a plus, I guess.

As Exra pointed out last week, accidental discharges outnumber actual security incidents by a large margin – do you want more of that?

If guns are necessary to prevent shootings, how come shootings are so rare in Canada?
commented 2018-02-25 17:44:47 -0500
Once again Ms. Stephenson you are are blowing pixie dust in the air hoping nobody will notice: – “Whatever cute sidearm the teacher has down his pants doesn’t stand a chance.”…. Yeah, but suppose, more realistically, that the teacher doesn’t have a “cute sidearm” down his pants but keeps a .357 Magnum revolver locked in his desk?… Have you every shot a .357?… Do you have any idea of the firepower?… Didn’t think so…
commented 2018-02-25 17:42:04 -0500
Actually Andrew, there are an estimated 15 million AR15s in the U.S., are you really going to be able to control all of them?
Given a choice of a pistol or no pistol in the classroom, I’ll take the pistol every time even though the other guy has a rifle. Up close a pistol can be very effective. Take the case of the Texas cop who killed two Islamic terrorists armed with assault rifles with his service pistol, score two for a good guy with a handgun.
commented 2018-02-25 17:26:37 -0500
Parkland mass shooting was preventable weeks in advance.
commented 2018-02-25 17:22:02 -0500
Keith, so true.
commented 2018-02-25 15:58:47 -0500
Psychopath’s, Bank Robbers, Street gang members, do not apply for Gun Permits. Trump is right, ‘Arm’ the school staff. This is the world we live in and is a direct result of Socialism and it’s retarded followers.
commented 2018-02-25 15:47:24 -0500
“George Dyer commented 2018-02-25 14:03:56 -0500
Lots of discussion going on regarding the pro’s and con’s of allowing teachers to be armed.
I’ve imagined back when my own children were young and at school. I picture them, inside a classroom with other students and a teacher. Then say, an armed intruder is in the school, going from one classroom to the next, and the next, shooting and killing each classroom’s occupants. My child’s classroom is next. The shooter enters, and at this moment I imagine two options; do I wish that my child’s teacher made the choice to be armed or unarmed?”

If you keep the “armed intruder” from being armed, then the question is moot. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

If it comes down to a gunfight in the classroom, my money’s on the guy with the AR15. Whatever cute sidearm the teacher has down his pants doesn’t stand a chance.
commented 2018-02-25 14:03:56 -0500
Lots of discussion going on regarding the pro’s and con’s of allowing teachers to be armed.
I’ve imagined back when my own children were young and at school. I picture them, inside a classroom with other students and a teacher. Then say, an armed intruder is in the school, going from one classroom to the next, and the next, shooting and killing each classroom’s occupants. My child’s classroom is next. The shooter enters, and at this moment I imagine two options; do I wish that my child’s teacher made the choice to be armed or unarmed?
I’ll bet dollars to doughnuts that today the parents of those seventeen dead children, if they could go back in time, would have their children’s teachers make the same choice that I would wish for.
commented 2018-02-25 13:58:33 -0500
Trump did a great job holding this listening session. He got out in front of CNN’s scripted show trial and demonstrated how the subject can be approached rationally.